Why the multiverse?

  • Thread starter JohnLuck
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  • #26
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I understand the math says at some point it's going to possibly happen, but do you really think with enough monkeys tapping on typewriters, at some point you'll get shakespears complete sonnets (in order)? The math says it'll happen, but it won't. Isn't this when you get rid of the mathematician in you and use common sense.
Well, monkeys aren't true random typewriter-letter-pressers so even with infinite time they probably won't write Shakespeare. A quantum random number generator typing letters would, though, eventually.

Besides, there are 350 billion (?) galaxies in the observable universe. Even if this is a fraction of the real number, the number is real, not infinity. Yes, perhaps the space of the universe may be infinite,(not likely ((?)) ) The number of universes must be finite. There must be a correlation between the (finite) size of the universe and the number of possible multiverses.
Right(?)
Nope. The finiteness of the observable universe need have nothing to do with the infiniteness of the extended universe, or of the multiverse. As for bowing to intuition rather than mathematics, well, we are talking about the grandest scales we know of in this reality; there is no reason to expect that your intuition is of any help here, unless it has been well trained in the relevant mathematics. This scale is far beyond the scope our primitive ape-minds are equipped to handle without the tools of science, of which mathematics is the most powerful.
 
  • #27
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The multiverse argument has a convenient escape clause - other universes are causally disconnected from our observable universe. I like the concept, but, this apparent unfalsifiability clause really turns me off.
no totally disconnected.

Alexander Vilenkin.
http://www.2physics.com/search/label/5-Breakthroughs

3. Evidence for the multiverse. Inflationary cosmology leads to the multiverse picture, with multiple "bubble universes" expanding and occasionally colliding with one another. Collisions of our bubble with others may have observational signatures in cosmic microwave background and in gravitational waves. A discovery of such a collision would provide a direct evidence for the existence of the multiverse.


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  • #28
phinds
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... Not to mention that mathematics is, at it's heart, systematic logic, so if it is telling us something then probably we should listen.
Well, FIRST we should listen to nature, then if some system of math happens to described it well, and gives us a good tool to work with our understanding of nature, that's great but never forget that the map is not the territory.
 
  • #29
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However inflationary cosmology has been invoked as a reason to invoke a multiverse. I find this slightly more compelling. If we want to know if there really is a multiverse w need to address 2 questions.
1 did inflation really happen? The evidence looks good so far, but I don’t think it’s a done deal yet with the lack of a gravity wave spectrum.
Without a direct measurement of course we can’t be so sure the theorists are correct. They can bungle things too. But that’s life. Science doesn’t have to give us yes or no answers, some answers from science are compelling and others are just suggestive. The multiverse arguments may never be compelling but they may be strongly suggestive especially if the two above criteria can be established.
right.
But slowly, step by step it will be done

Detection of B-mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background with Data from the South Pole Telescope
http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.5830v1


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http://news.uchicago.edu/article/20...ts-big-bang-may-hold-clues-universe-s-infancy

"B modes from inflation are caused by gravitational waves. These ripples in space-time are generated by intense gravitational turmoil, conditions that would have existed during inflation. These waves, stretching and squeezing the fabric of the universe, would give rise to the telltale twisted polarization patterns of B modes. Measuring the resulting polarization would not only confirm the theory of inflation—a huge scientific achievement in itself—but would also give scientists information about physics at very high energies—much higher than can be achieved with particle accelerators"


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