Words Used Differently to Describe Wine

  • Thread starter BillTre
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In summary, the conversation discusses the use of descriptive terms in wine reviews and how they can be confusing. The NY Times article by a wine critic explains his approach to using words to describe wine flavors, which includes 15 specific terms. The author of the article is also the nephew of science writer Isaac Asimov. The conversation also touches on the use of certain words, such as "delicious" and "fruity", versus others like "complex" and "profound" in wine descriptions. Finally, a parody of a wine review is mentioned, highlighting the use of descriptive language in wine reviews.
  • #1
BillTre
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I used to drink wine fairly frequently, but not so much now.
The descriptions always seemed somewhat confusing to me.
Here is a NY Times article on how a particular wine critic describe how he uses words to describe wine flavors.
Some of it makes more sense to me now.

He describes 15 terms. His effort goes down well.

His lean article does not have too much length, a lot of structure and has depth, but not a lot of precision in my opinion.
 
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  • #2
Nice article. I note that the author is nephew of the wonderful science writer Isaac Asimov.
 
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  • #3
hutchphd said:
Nice article. I note that the author is nephew of the wonderful science writer Isaac Asimov.
I was wondering about that.
 
  • #4
in regard to words describing wine, i have noticed that, of late, i often use the words "delicious", "fruity" "acidic", "alcoholic", "gentle", ..., but not so much the words "interesting", "complex", "thoughtful", or "profound".
 
  • #5
A made up wine review parody:
Rather upstartish, full-bodied but mild, this convivial claret has strong, but unalarming, blackcurrant and cherry overtones, almost reminiscent of Anjou pears, and a smooth, not too tannic, finish.
 

Related to Words Used Differently to Describe Wine

1. What is the difference between "dry" and "sweet" when describing wine?

When describing wine, "dry" refers to a wine that has little to no residual sugar, resulting in a less sweet taste. On the other hand, "sweet" refers to a wine with a higher amount of residual sugar, resulting in a sweeter taste. The perception of sweetness in wine can also be influenced by factors such as acidity and tannins.

2. How does the term "crisp" describe a wine?

When used to describe wine, "crisp" refers to a wine that has a refreshing and lively quality, often attributed to its acidity. This term is commonly used to describe white wines, especially those made from grapes such as Sauvignon Blanc or Riesling.

3. What does it mean when a wine is described as "oaky"?

"Oaky" is a term used to describe a wine that has been aged in oak barrels, resulting in flavors and aromas such as vanilla, caramel, or toast. This can also refer to wines that have been in contact with oak chips or staves during the winemaking process.

4. What is the difference between "light-bodied" and "full-bodied" wines?

When describing wine, "light-bodied" refers to a wine that is low in alcohol and has a lighter mouthfeel, often with delicate flavors. On the other hand, "full-bodied" refers to a wine that is higher in alcohol and has a richer, more robust mouthfeel, often with bolder flavors. This can also be influenced by factors such as tannins and acidity.

5. How does the term "earthy" describe a wine?

"Earthy" is a term used to describe a wine that has aromas and flavors reminiscent of the earth, such as mushrooms, truffles, or forest floor. This can be attributed to the soil and terroir where the grapes were grown and can add complexity to a wine's profile.

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