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Why are intermolecular HCl molecules among them not considered hydrogen bonds?

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kashiark
#1
Jul4-09, 01:08 PM
P: 210
A hydrogen bond is the attractive force between one electronegative atom and a hydrogen covalently bonded to another electronegative atom. Doesn't this apply to hydrochloric acid?
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Wax
#2
Jul4-09, 01:47 PM
P: 148
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_bond
It results from a dipole-dipole force with a hydrogen atom bonded to nitrogen, oxygen or fluorine.

Studying general chemistry? That statement was from wiki so basically, it's gotta involve one of those elements.
cosmo123
#3
Jul4-09, 04:56 PM
P: 25
Youd expect it to because Cl is pretty electronegative, but chlorine is also a very large molecule, so it basically cant get close enough to the hydrogens to cause any particularly strong dipole, and the hydrogen has a high charge density so it deformes the large Cl into a fairly covelant bond.


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