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5.8ghz laser?

  1. Sep 16, 2010 #1
    what would a 5.8ghz laser look like. i am just wondering because it would be so much nicer to do a radio link with a laser instead of a 2m antenna
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 16, 2010 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    At 5.8GHz it sounds more like maser.
     
  4. Sep 16, 2010 #3
    interesting did not know that
    has anything like that been used for sending a modulated signal?
    i would imagine it behaves like a laser right?
     
  5. Sep 17, 2010 #4

    f95toli

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    Masers have been around for even longer than lasers. So yes, you can send information using a modulated maser.
     
  6. Sep 18, 2010 #5

    Redbelly98

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    Existing masers require a molecular beam in a vacuum chamber. Operating a vacuum pump is more cumbersome than having an antenna. Again, one would need to identify the gain material, and what conditions are required to achieve gain, before one can claim that it would be a nice easy device to operate.

    The wavelength corresponding to 5.8 GHz is 5.2 cm, so I would think a good directional transmitter could be made using conventional electronics.
     
  7. Sep 19, 2010 #6
    hmm yeah what gas has electrons with the right energy state for that frequency?
     
  8. Sep 20, 2010 #7

    f95toli

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    No they don't. There are all sorts of masers (just as there are all sorts of lasers); some e.g, work by using transitions in ions (say Fe) implanted in a solid medium (say sapphire).

    That said, masers ARE much more cumbersome to use than lasers so they are rarely useful in practical applications.
     
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