A question regarding Traditional MPM and computers

In summary, the conversation is about the computer processing power required for a single pixel, a loaf of bread, or an entire human body to follow the laws of MPM physics. The person asking the question is a video game director and is looking for someone to provide insight on this topic. They have searched online for examples but have not found any information on the capability of their computers. They have also reached out to someone who may have knowledge about this topic. The conversation has been moved to the programming and computer science category.
  • #1
Blackwolfgod127
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TL;DR Summary
Computer processing power to calculate a single item in a game
Hey, I'm a video game director, and to put it simply I would like to know what you think the computer processing power required for a single a single pixel, a loaf of bread, or an entire human body would be to follow the laws of MPM physics, which you can google.
They have examples, but no info regarding the capability of their computers.
so say for example, I apply this to every pixel in the game, and I make a piece of bread
Does not have to be a single pixel, just in general for a simple item?

If you don't know, please ask someone that does, I really need to know this.
 
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  • #3
Blackwolfgod127 said:
They have examples, but no info regarding the capability of their computers
First pdf in ref 18 (2013) of the wikipedia lemma has a table
1581783312048.png
 
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  • #4
Paging @Janus in case all of his rendering work may provide some insight into the OP's questions. :smile:
 
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  • #5
If I didn't misinterpret your question, we still can't do that right, even with enormous processing capacity.
 

Related to A question regarding Traditional MPM and computers

1. What is Traditional MPM?

Traditional MPM, or Traditional Multi-Program Management, is a method of managing computer processes where multiple programs are run on a single computer simultaneously.

2. How does Traditional MPM differ from modern methods of computer process management?

Traditional MPM differs from modern methods such as multi-threading and multi-tasking in that it does not allow for parallel execution of programs. Instead, programs are executed one at a time, with the operating system switching between them.

3. What are the advantages of using Traditional MPM?

Traditional MPM allows for efficient use of resources, as only one program is using the CPU at a time. It also simplifies programming, as there is no need to manage multiple threads or tasks. Additionally, it can prevent conflicts and errors that may arise with parallel execution.

4. What are the limitations of Traditional MPM?

One major limitation of Traditional MPM is its lack of parallelism, which can result in slower execution of programs. It also does not allow for true multitasking, as only one program can be actively using the CPU at a time. This can lead to decreased efficiency and longer processing times.

5. Is Traditional MPM still used today?

While it is not as commonly used as modern methods, Traditional MPM is still used in certain systems and applications where parallel execution is not necessary or feasible. This includes embedded systems and some legacy software. However, it is not the preferred method for most modern computing needs.

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