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Absolute Hot - infographic on temperatures

  1. Feb 12, 2015 #1

    DaveC426913

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    Just stumbled across this on my favorite site Dark Roasted Blend:

    I did not know there was an 'absolute hot'.

    (it's too large to post here)
    http://i.imgur.com/iHW7Dwh.png
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2015 #2

    davenn

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    Thanks Dave, interesting graphic :)

    Dave
     
  4. Feb 12, 2015 #3

    phinds

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    Well it may not be "absolute hot", but it sure is absolutely hot :w
     
  5. Feb 13, 2015 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    Sadly, the notion of "absolute hot" is utter and complete nonsense. The Planck temperature is no more the highest temperature than the Planck resistance (30 ohms) is the highest (or would it be lowest?) resistance.
     
  6. Feb 13, 2015 #5

    DaveC426913

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    Is the explanation wrong as well? That our physics models break down at that point?
     
  7. Feb 13, 2015 #6

    Vanadium 50

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    Do our physics models break down at 30 ohms?
     
  8. Feb 13, 2015 #7

    DaveC426913

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    I don't know. I've never heard the Planck resistance, so I can't draw a correlation with the claim about the Planck temp.

    But if the infographic is nonsense I should pull it down.
     
  9. Feb 13, 2015 #8

    Vanadium 50

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    The only nonsenical part is the "absolute hot" part. (But that's the part that was, unfortunately, featured)
     
  10. Feb 15, 2015 #9

    Redbelly98

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    It is interesting to see a wide range of observed temperatures in one compilation.

    Some other oversights:

    Scientific notation is mostly avoided, presumably out of consideration for a lay audience, but is used when referring to the age of the universe in a couple of places.

    The "coldest place in the Universe" occurs within our very own galaxy! What are the odds?
     
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