Absorbtion of EM quanta

  • Thread starter Hornbein
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I started out with a video of someone "measuring" the speed of light by microwaving a chocolate bar. Not surprisingly, this turned out to be partially bogus.
http://morningcoffeephysics.com/measuring-the-speed-of-light-with-chocolate-and-a-microwave-oven/

This sparked some more questions. Let's (falsely) assume that our chocolate bar is heated by a standing microwave. I think I am right in that the probability that a photon will be absorbed in any particular location is the square of a sine wave. Is it true that this probability does not vary from moment to moment?

I hope that this is clear.
 

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jfizzix
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The probability will oscillate from moment to moment, (on a time scale of (1/2,450,000,000) seconds, or about 0.4 nanoseconds), but the amplitude of the oscillations will stay the same, so hot spots don't change to cold spots, and vise versa.
 
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f95toli
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I don't think that is correct. The probability should be constant, but will depend on if you are coupling via the electric or magnet dipole.moment. .
This should be exactly equivalent to a cavity/circuit-QED experiments where the ion/qubits are placed in node/antinodes of the resonator (depending on the type of coupling you want) to maximize the coupling.
 
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