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Acceleration Vs. Displacement Graph

  1. May 4, 2008 #1
    I Have a question

    If acceleration(a)=Displacement(x)
    and at time(t)=0 if Velocity(u) is 0
    then we have to find velocity at time=2 secs

    Attempt At Answer
    given: a=x
    or v dv = x dx
    integrating both sides with initial velocity 0 and displ. s
    v2=x2-s2
    or
    v=√(x2-s2)
    or
    dx/√(x2-s2)=dt
    integrating again
    we get
    (x/s)=cos t

    but the problem is how do we get value of initial displ. s??
    if we ignore s
    we get
    x=e^t
    but the graph of this gives x=1 at t=o so we cant ignore "s"

    Plz help..
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2008 #2

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    "displacement" is the distance moved- not just the final position. Take initial s to be anything you like since you would just subtract it off anyway. s= 0 is easiest.
     
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