Air Navigation and Course Correction. Semester exam in 45 minutes.

In summary, the problem involves a pilot flying 2875 km in 3 hours and 20 minutes to an airport 18 degrees east of north from the departure point. The pilot encounters a 130 km/hr wind from due south and needs to determine the ground speed, air speed, and magnetic compass heading. To solve the problem, the cosine law and sine law can be used, and the distance must be broken into components to account for the wind's effect.
  • #1
pablot93
1
0

Homework Statement


A pilot wishes to fly 2875 km to an airport 18 degrees east of north from his departure point(for the sake of the problem and simplicity, use the origin). He wants to make the trip in 3 hours and 20 minutes. The pilot finds that he actually has to make a change in his air heading to compensate for a 130 km/hr wind coming from due south. What should be his...
A)Ground Speed
B)Air Speed
C)Magnetic Compass heading

Homework Equations


Cosine Law
c^2 = a^2 + b^2 - 2ab cosC

The Attempt at a Solution


I know you make a parallelogram, with his ground speed and the wind speed, and then use the cosine law. From there, use the sine law. I just need someone to walk me through it please.
I have my physics exam in an hour and I'm still kind of iffy on these types of problem from the beginning of the semester.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
A good place to start would be to see how much of the distance the wind speed would propel the plane in 3 and 1/3 hours.

Whatever is left is what the plane's velocity must compensate for, but remember that the wind is only going north which means you're going to need to break the distance into components.
 
  • #3


As a scientist, it is important to approach this problem systematically and use the appropriate equations to find the solution. Let's break down the steps to solve this problem:

1. First, let's draw a diagram to represent the situation. The pilot's departure point (origin) is at the center, and the airport he wants to reach is located 2875 km away in the direction of 18 degrees east of north. We can label this direction as the desired course or true heading (TH).

2. Next, we need to take into account the 130 km/hr wind coming from due south. This means that the wind is blowing in the direction of 180 degrees, or south. We can label this direction as the wind direction or wind heading (WH).

3. To determine the pilot's ground speed (GS), we need to find the resultant of his air speed (AS) and the wind speed (WS). We can use the parallelogram method to find the resultant, which will give us the magnitude and direction of the GS. We can label the magnitude of the resultant as GR and the direction as ground heading (GH).

4. Now, we can use the cosine law to find the magnitude of the resultant (GR). The cosine law states that c^2 = a^2 + b^2 - 2ab cosC, where c is the side opposite to angle C. In our case, GR is the side opposite to the angle between the AS and WS, which we can label as angle A. So, our equation becomes GR^2 = AS^2 + WS^2 - 2(AS)(WS)cosA. We know the values of AS and WS, so we can solve for GR.

5. To find the direction of the GH, we can use the sine law. The sine law states that a/sinA = b/sinB = c/sinC, where a, b, and c are the sides of a triangle and A, B, and C are the opposite angles. In our case, we know the values of GR and the angle opposite to GH, which we can label as angle B. So, our equation becomes GR/sinB = WS/sinA. We can solve for angle B, which will give us the direction of the GH.

6. Now, we can use the triangle formed by the AS, WS, and GH to find the pilot's air heading (AH).
 

Related to Air Navigation and Course Correction. Semester exam in 45 minutes.

1. What is air navigation?

Air navigation is the process of determining the position and direction of an aircraft in order to safely and efficiently travel from one location to another.

2. How is air navigation performed?

Air navigation is typically performed using a combination of instruments, such as altimeters, compasses, and GPS systems, to determine the aircraft's position and direction in relation to the ground and other navigational points.

3. What is course correction?

Course correction refers to the process of adjusting the direction of an aircraft in flight in order to stay on the desired flight path and reach the intended destination.

4. Why is course correction necessary?

Course correction is necessary to ensure the safety of the aircraft and its passengers, as well as to maintain the efficiency and accuracy of the flight. It also allows for adjustments to be made in case of unexpected weather conditions or other obstacles.

5. How much time is typically given for a semester exam on air navigation and course correction?

The amount of time given for a semester exam on air navigation and course correction can vary, but it is typically around 45 minutes. This allows for enough time to cover all important concepts and demonstrate understanding of the material.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
8K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
9K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
Back
Top