Air Pressure vs Liquid Pressure

In summary, the article discusses a method for turning algae into green fuel by heating it in a closed steel pipe fitting until it reaches 570 degrees. The pressure inside the container would depend on the type of liquid being heated and if it would normally be a gas at that temperature. The article also mentions the use of "gay-lussac's law" for pressure of gases, but this may not apply to thick liquid algae. The experiment was conducted with a small batch of algae being heated for 10-40 minutes, reaching the desired temperature in only one minute.
  • #1
lizardman94
1
0
Okay, so I am looking at this article (link at bottom) and it says they have a microorganism liquid contained inside of a CLOSED steel pipe fitting and they heat it until it's reached about 570 degrees inside.

SO HOW MUCH PRESSURE GROWS INSIDE THE CLOSED CONTAINER?

As far as a real life application, I have used the "gay-lussac's law" but this applies to pressure of GASES, how much pressure is inside of it if it's pretty much all thick liquidy algae goop? I want to know what pressure it gets to so that I can have an idea of what material I need to build a pressure vessel to conduct this type of experiment with.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/gree...to-green-fuel-zb0z1211zmar.aspx#axzz36vOWbnzB
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
If the liquid would normally be a gas at that temperature - then you can see that a lot of pressure is needed to keep it in a liquid state.
To make their one-minute biocrude, Savage and Julia Faeth, a doctoral student in Savage’s lab, filled a steel pipe connector with 1.5 milliliters of wet algae, capped it and plunged it into 1,100-degree-Fahrenheit sand. The small volume ensured that the algae was heated through. Previously the team heated the algae from 10 to 90 minutes and saw the best results when treating the algae for 10 to 40 minutes at 570 degrees. A small batch of algae can reach this temperature in one minute.​
Actual paper the article is based on: https://aiche.confex.com/aiche/2012/webprogram/Paper280193.html

So I think you want to look at "superheating water".
 

Related to Air Pressure vs Liquid Pressure

What is air pressure and how is it different from liquid pressure?

Air pressure refers to the force exerted by the weight of air molecules in a given area. It is measured in units of pressure, such as pounds per square inch (PSI) or pascals (Pa). Liquid pressure, on the other hand, refers to the force exerted by the weight of liquid molecules in a given area. It is also measured in units of pressure, but the values are typically higher than air pressure due to the higher density of liquid molecules.

What factors affect air pressure and liquid pressure?

The main factor that affects both air pressure and liquid pressure is the depth of the substance. As the depth increases, the weight of the molecules above also increases, resulting in higher pressure. Other factors that can affect air pressure include temperature, altitude, and humidity. For liquid pressure, factors such as density and gravity also play a role.

How do air pressure and liquid pressure impact everyday life?

Air pressure and liquid pressure have various effects on our daily lives. For example, changes in air pressure can cause weather patterns to shift, leading to changes in temperature and precipitation. Liquid pressure is essential for the functioning of hydraulic systems, such as car brakes and heavy machinery. It also plays a role in the movement of fluids in our bodies, such as blood circulation.

Can air pressure and liquid pressure be measured and compared?

Yes, both air pressure and liquid pressure can be measured using pressure gauges. However, due to the different units of measurement, they cannot be directly compared. To compare the two, they must be converted into a common unit of measurement, such as pascals. It is also important to note that the measurement of pressure is affected by external factors, such as temperature and altitude, so it may not always be an accurate representation of the actual pressure.

What are some real-life examples of air pressure and liquid pressure in action?

One example of air pressure in action is the use of air pumps to inflate tires or sports balls. The compressed air inside the pump creates high air pressure, which is then transferred to the object being inflated. An example of liquid pressure in action is the operation of a hydraulic car lift. The pressure created by the hydraulic fluid allows the lift to raise heavy vehicles off the ground. Another example is the use of water pressure to power water fountains and sprinkler systems.

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