Angular width of first-order visible spectrum

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a diffraction grating and the attempt to find the angular width. The initial calculation resulted in an angular width of 0.71 degrees, but it was later discovered that the units were switched from lines per millimetre to lines per centimetre. After correcting this mistake, the new calculation yielded an angular width of 7.33 degrees.
  • #1
Bolter
262
31
Homework Statement
See image attached below
Relevant Equations
dsin(theta) = m*lambda
This is a diffraction grating problem I have been given that I am trying to answer

Screenshot 2020-03-23 at 20.17.47.png

Made a attempt at it and just wanted to see if I done this correctly or not? I get an angular width of 0.71 degrees which is very small

IMG_4327.JPG


Any help is much appreciated! Thanks
 
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  • #2
You switched from lines per millimetre to lines per centimetre at the start.
 
  • Like
Likes Bolter
  • #3
etotheipi said:
You switched from lines per millimetre to lines per centimetre at the start.

Oh shoot yes you're right :doh: I don't know what I was thinking there. This must change the whole answer then. I get my distance between adjacent slits to be 1/415,000 m = 2.409... x 10^-6 m

Running through the same process but with new d value now, I get the angular width to be 7.33 degrees now?
 

Related to Angular width of first-order visible spectrum

1. What is the angular width of the first-order visible spectrum?

The angular width of the first-order visible spectrum is approximately 137 degrees. This is the angle between the red and violet ends of the spectrum when viewed from a distance of one meter.

2. How is the angular width of the first-order visible spectrum measured?

The angular width of the first-order visible spectrum is typically measured using a spectrometer, which separates light into its component wavelengths and allows for precise measurement of the angular width.

3. What factors can affect the angular width of the first-order visible spectrum?

The angular width of the first-order visible spectrum can be affected by factors such as the thickness of the diffracting material, the wavelength of the incident light, and the angle of incidence.

4. Why is the angular width of the first-order visible spectrum important?

The angular width of the first-order visible spectrum is important because it helps scientists and engineers understand the properties of light and how it interacts with different materials. It also has practical applications in fields such as optics and spectroscopy.

5. Can the angular width of the first-order visible spectrum be changed or manipulated?

Yes, the angular width of the first-order visible spectrum can be changed or manipulated by altering the conditions under which the light is diffracted, such as by changing the angle of incidence or using different diffracting materials.

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