Anti-Matter- Regular Matter- Pulse Collisions?

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential outcome of a collision between an Anti-Matter star and Matter star. It is believed that such a collision would produce enough gamma rays to sterilize a large portion of a galaxy. However, the possibility of the stars bouncing back due to the annihilation of their surfaces and the diminishing effect of gravity causing them to eventually drift apart is also considered. There is also a mention of the stars potentially reaching a quasi-equilibrium or being destroyed due to mixing and pressure. The complexity of modeling such a scenario is acknowledged.
  • #1
Arian
57
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I was reading about what would happen if an Anti-Matter star and Matter star collided. What I read says the collision would make enough gamma rays to sterilize and entire eighth of a galaxy of life.
Yet, I thought about something, when the two collide, their surfaces would touch first. (Duh) So there surface's both annilate each other producing energy, that, would 'bounce' the stars back. Gravity would then take over again and pull them closer in which their surface's would annialte and the stars bounce back. So we have a kind of 'super-pulses' that would hit each other on some time scale.
Yet, since the stars are getting smaller, their collisions get smaller.
At some point the stars would not have enough gravity to pull each other together and they would drift off, rather small into space.

So the Matter- Anti-Matter Collisions would happen several time acting like a dwindling Pulse.
Thoughts?
 
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  • #2
It doesn't have to be pulsed. They could also reach a quasi-equilibrium. Regular stars are an example already: They are in an equilibrium between fusion and energy dissipation towards the outside. Alternatively the dynamics could lead to so much mixing that the resulting pressure destroys the stars, with their matter flying in all directions.

It sounds quite complicated to model that.
 

Related to Anti-Matter- Regular Matter- Pulse Collisions?

1. What is anti-matter?

Anti-matter is a type of matter composed of particles that have the same mass as regular matter, but with opposite charges. For example, the anti-electron (called a positron) has the same mass as an electron, but with a positive charge instead of a negative charge.

2. How is anti-matter created?

Anti-matter can be created through high-energy collisions, such as those that occur in particle accelerators. It can also be produced naturally through certain radioactive decays.

3. What happens when anti-matter and regular matter collide?

When anti-matter and regular matter collide, they annihilate each other, releasing a large amount of energy in the form of gamma rays. This process is called matter-anti-matter annihilation.

4. Can anti-matter be used as a source of energy?

Yes, anti-matter has the potential to be a highly efficient source of energy. However, the production and storage of anti-matter is currently very difficult and expensive, making it impractical for large-scale energy production.

5. What are the applications of anti-matter- regular matter- pulse collisions?

Collisions between anti-matter and regular matter can be used for fundamental research in particle physics, as well as for medical imaging and cancer treatment. It can also potentially be used for propulsion in spacecraft and for energy production, although more research and development is needed in these areas.

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