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B Any new news from Parker?

  1. Jan 10, 2019 #1

    sophiecentaur

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    The first perihelion of Parker was a while ago now and some data has, apparently, been sent back and presented. But I can't find any information about the data. Does anyone have a link where I can find out some more details about this first-in-history project results?
     
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  3. Jan 10, 2019 #2
  4. Jan 10, 2019 #3

    sophiecentaur

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    That's probably what they would say but how many TB of data is there to process and why is it nearly 2 months since data started arriving and still nothing in the popular media? IT does strike me as strange that they are not falling over themselves to justify the expense of the mission with a few "Guess what chaps" bits of first time information.
    What could be wrong?
     
  5. Jan 10, 2019 #4

    phyzguy

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    Um... the government is shut down, perhaps?
     
  6. Jan 10, 2019 #5

    sophiecentaur

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    I read this first as a 'conspiracy theory' ironic suggestion - but then I though again. :smile:
    But I would imagine the Parker project staff would work for nothing if they could see some useful results at the end of this.
    Note, we can't yet blame Brexit for it - but people may well try to, at some stage.
     
  7. Jan 10, 2019 #6

    davenn

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    that was my first thought as well
     
  8. Jan 11, 2019 #7

    mfb

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    Data analysis takes time. They could show some pictures, but we have pictures of the Sun from Earth as well, pictures from the probe wouldn't look different to non-experts.
     
  9. Jan 12, 2019 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    Oh yes but the data link is slow so there is limit to just how much can have arrived and they have already presented some results. Even if they are just confirmatory about existing theories, results would be interesting. Pictures may not be as interesting as the non pictorial data.
    I hope it's not just because people don't appreciate 'null' experimental results.
     
  10. Jan 12, 2019 #9

    mfb

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    So what exactly is your point? That they haven't worked as fast as you would like to?
     
  11. Jan 13, 2019 #10

    sophiecentaur

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    My OP was no more a complaint than a remark that sunspot numbers are low or that global temperatures are rising. My point is that it seems out of character to be delaying even minimal communication of data. It's normal to publish some sort of result asap. The very first Ultima Thule picture was rotten quality and only told us two things - the object is there and has two parts but the image went out and we all appreciated it. Are you not waiting for Parker results with bated breath?
    I know images are 'different' data from other stuff but if there was something to tell a conference then that would normally have been made public in a pre-digested form. Organisations are funded because of public opinion (or military requirements). Spending on Moon projects dropped because the public were not seduced well enough by NASA and I am 'just wondering'.
     
  12. Jan 13, 2019 #11

    mfb

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    I know data analysis takes time and they will publish things when they are studied properly. Presenting preliminary results (beyond pictures) quickly means more work in total, which means the publications will come out later.
    I prefer them working on the proper analyses, and release intermediate results only where time matters (e.g. intermediate Gaia data because of all the things that depend on it) or not too much extra work.
     
  13. Jan 13, 2019 #12

    sophiecentaur

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    That is a point but PR is a huge part of any space endeavour. Whatever the reason for the delay, it is still out of character, which makes one wonder. The PR people in any organisation are not the ones who do the 'work' so they are not too busy to keep in touch with the public.
    "Strange results / exactly what we would have expected / poor quality data so far" would all be possible messages that could have come out from the project after two months. Why not? By the nature of the comms channel, they are not dealing with an insuperable amount of data from a few weeks of transmission. Wouldn't we expect some sort of statement of when to expect some results - even before the project launch?
     
  14. Jan 14, 2019 #13

    mfb

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    Delay relative to what? Where do you get the idea from that we are entitled to have results after x weeks? And how did you determine x?
    The work is in the research part, writing press releases is easy.
     
  15. Jan 14, 2019 #14

    sophiecentaur

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    Relative to the time that usually elapses for publishing prelim data from other projects.
    There is no "entitlement" involved in my remarks - you are reading more into my posts than is there. If it were the very first space mission to fly, I wouldn't have a reason to wonder. But there have been hundreds of missions to date and they usually seem to, at least, drip feed the public whenever possible with prelim results.
    Just saying that there's a lot of data and it takes a long time to analyse is hardly a reason for the wait. The only reason for an extended 'wait' is usually when they're waiting for a rare suitable event out there as with gravity wave detection.
    I am not a dissatisfied customer looking for an apology / excuse from Parker. I am just wondering about the situation. In many such cases, PF would have come back with a useful and informed reply.
     
  16. Jan 14, 2019 #15

    mfb

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    It is. It is in fact the only reason. If it wouldn't take time to get and analyze the data we would have some results by now.
    Gravitational waves. Gravity waves are things like water waves, they have been known much longer.
    That's exactly the impression I get from your posts, however.
     
  17. Jan 15, 2019 #16

    sophiecentaur

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    That is merely your assertion. What we can say is that it 'may' be the reason.
    If that's what you're looking for then it could give that impression. My posts actually just show 'surprise' at the long wait - particularly as some results have actually been present but no publically.
    As far as I know, they are not detected every day, though. I thought my meaning was perfectly clear. Is the only solar phenomenon that they are looking for of that nature?
     
  18. Jan 15, 2019 #17

    Janus

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    According to the blog, the data wasn't scheduled to start downloading via the Deep Space Network until Dec 7th, and this download was going to take several weeks. We are now just a bit under 6 weeks after Dec 7th, and 6 weeks falls in the range of "several". So it is conceivable that they haven't even finished downloading the data yet.
     
  19. Jan 15, 2019 #18

    sophiecentaur

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    Thanks for that positive response.
    I read that transmissions had to be delayed until Parker was to one side of the Sun. Presumably that is to protect the transmitting system and possibly to eliminate or reduce solar noise with a directive receive dish. Although wouldn't receive antenna need to be very narrow beam? I would imagine that the transmit power would be fairly high (solar powered!!!) but maybe the carrier to noise ratio is poor due to its noisy neighbour.
    The main reason for my interest / concern was that I understood that some results had already been presented. Perhaps all will be clear, once they start to publish.
     
  20. Feb 7, 2019 #19

    sophiecentaur

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    The last entry in the NASA Parker Mission news was 12 Dec. Nothing since. Before there was anything to tell us, there was an entry every couple of weeks. Nasa usually keeps its loyal public informed about every move it makes - it's needs US money. I am still still surprised that there hasn't been a peep out of them. I hope it's only because the staff have just not been getting paid.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 7, 2019
  21. Feb 11, 2019 #20
    Check the blog, they posted just after the shutdown was suspended.
     
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