Anyone want to take a look at this?

  • Thread starter bullroar_86
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In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a nonuniform bar suspended by two cords at different angles. The task is to find the distance from the left end of the bar to its center of mass. The answer given by the source is 2.93, but after plugging in the values, the participants of the conversation are getting 2.19. They question the accuracy of the answer and suggest that either the equation or the answer may be incorrect. Despite going through the algebra step by step, they cannot seem to arrive at the given answer. The conversation ends with the hope that the final answer was simply a mistake on the part of the source.
  • #1
bullroar_86
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0
I have a similar question to this, and I'm trying to figure out how it works. I think the answer here might be wrong.

It won't copy/paste right so here's the link

http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~gan/teaching/spring99/C13.pdf

A nonuniform bar of weight W is suspended
at rest in a horizontal position by two massless
cords. One cord makes the angle q = 36.9° with
the vertical; the other makes the angle f = 53.1°
with the vertical. If the length L of the bar is 6.10
m, compute the distance x from the left-hand end
of the bar to its center of mass.


When i plug in the values, I'm getting 2.19

the answer there is 2.93
 
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  • #2
Right, go ahead.
 
  • #3
was that a sarcastic right? or a "it's right" right?

=P


The algebra seems to make sense, but I'm just not getting the same answer as them
 
  • #4
I'm getting 2.19 as well by plugging in the numbers to the last equation given in the explanation. It's definitely possible that either the equation is written incorrectly or perhaps the answer given is simply wrong.
 
  • #5
Eturnalblonde said:
I'm getting 2.19 as well by plugging in the numbers to the last equation given in the explanation. It's definitely possible that either the equation is written incorrectly or perhaps the answer given is simply wrong.


Yeah I am hoping the final answer was just a miscalculation on their part.

I've gone through the anwer step by step, and all the algebra looks good to me.
 
  • #6
I generally supplement sarcasm with smileys. If it is a plain sentence then there is no sarcasm. Their equations are correct but your answer is right. (no smileys as you may find)
 

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