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Are wisdom teeth important to get out?

  1. Sep 29, 2009 #1
    I mean ones that arent causin irritation. What do you think?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 29, 2009 #2

    Moonbear

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    Ask your dentist. Some can not cause any pain...yet...but are situated in a place that is damaging your other molars and will eventually cause a problem. If they are growing in straight and there's room for them in your mouth, then they can be kept.
     
  4. Sep 29, 2009 #3
    i still have mine - it depends on the persons! My wifes grew the wrong way and she had to have them out?
     
  5. Sep 29, 2009 #4

    arildno

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    I think it depends quite a bit on their size.

    All my four were big, so I had to have them out.
     
  6. Sep 29, 2009 #5
    Moonbear is correct in my experience. Whether they need to be removed is really a question for a dentist since each person is different. You need to have enough room in your mouth and have them come in somewhat straight.

    I did not need to have mine removed since I had room when they came in.
     
  7. Sep 29, 2009 #6

    Borek

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    Mine are in place. No problems so far.
     
  8. Sep 29, 2009 #7

    FredGarvin

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    I still have mine too.
     
  9. Sep 29, 2009 #8
    Does that mean we are the wise ones? lol
     
  10. Sep 29, 2009 #9
    I had to have all mine removed. They didn't even come close to coming in correctly. They're pretty much vestigial and unless you have a giant Neanderthal mouth, they'll probably give you problems at some point in your life.
     
  11. Sep 29, 2009 #10

    DaveC426913

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    A brief analysis of the immediately available subjects (8 posters in this thread) results in a 50% retention rate, so...
     
  12. Sep 29, 2009 #11

    Monique

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    Another reason to have them taken out, besides impact issues on other molars, is that they can be hard to reach when you are brushing your teeth since they are in the back of your jaw. This can lead to caries. I had all four wisdom teeth taken out (plus four other molars when I was a teen, due to space restraints).
     
  13. Sep 29, 2009 #12
    when i was a kid, i had a dentist that wanted to take everyone's out. i think part of the reasoning is that youngsters heal up easily from the surgery, but if you need them taken out later in life, you're more likely to experience complications.

    i kept mine, no problems so far.
     
  14. Sep 29, 2009 #13

    DaveC426913

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    It was pretty standard practice back then, yes.
     
  15. Sep 29, 2009 #14

    Moonbear

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    Some of us were already too wise, so they had to take out the wisdom teeth to keep us from becoming too much of smart a**es.

    (I don't think it worked in my case. :biggrin:)
     
  16. Sep 30, 2009 #15

    tiny-tim

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    Caries

    I've had one wisdom tooth removed, one is ok, and the other two haven't come through yet, but look as if they'll cause no problems.

    It would have been better if I'd had that one removed earlier, since it came through at an awkward angle relative to the next tooth, which led to decay in that tooth because it was difficult to clean it.
     
  17. Sep 30, 2009 #16

    turbo

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    Still got all mine. Must be a big-mouth since they all fit fine.
     
  18. Sep 30, 2009 #17

    Pythagorean

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    My wisdom teeth aren't a problem yet, but my dentist predicts they will be.

    50% of people have Neanderthal mouths? :biggrin:

    The common explanation I hear is that our wisdom teeth were used for gnawing on roots in our ancestry. I postulate that in some cases, people who are able to keep their wisdom teeth may actually use them more (keeping them from floating by frequently applying pressure to them).
     
  19. Sep 30, 2009 #18
    Mine never came in. I guess some just have a genetic defect where they don't get any wisdom teeth.
     
  20. Sep 30, 2009 #19

    tiny-tim

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    ooh, they've gotta be somewhere! :redface:

    they're probably burrowing through to your brain! :biggrin:

    I know a woman whose two upper adult canine teeth are moving sideways instead of down …

    so they've missed her mouth completely, and you can see that she still has her milk teeth where those adult canines should be!

    Apparently her mother had the same thing.​
     
  21. Sep 30, 2009 #20
    It could be 100% and it still doesn't contradict what I was saying. Those four people could currently be having problems with them or could have problems later.
    Despite that, 8 isn't a very good representation of 6 billion.
    I doubt it. It just comes down to there not being enough room for them. If I applied pressure to my bottom left wisdom tooth, it would've probably jammed into my mandibular nerve. The tooth was completely parallel to it, lying right on top of it. There was a chance I could have permanantly lost feeling in the left side of my jaw from having that one taken out.

    Honestly, it's probably just the fact that some people have smaller teeth. Not that they're cavemen.
    You're evolving. I've also heard of people being born without appendixes.
     
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