Are you afraid that no one will care about your calculations?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the use of mathematical notation in philosophy and the fear of not being taken seriously. The importance of familiarizing oneself with previous work in the field and taking others seriously is also emphasized. The conversation eventually leads to a discussion on Immanuel Kant and his work in philosophy.
  • #1
I'm making some calculations in logic and I'm using a lot of invented notation and I'm hoping that it will make philosophy more mathematical but I'm often afraid no one will care about my calculations or bother to learn how to do them. Are you ever afraid that no one will care about your calculations? Do you ever plan on publishing proofs and worry that no one will bother to check your work?
 
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  • #2
The maths forum is for doing math, not speculating.
 
  • #3
My two cents:
There have been some very good philosopher - mathematicians (Bertrand Russell comes to mind.) One thing that is critical for people to take you seriously, is for you to take them seriously. If you haven't already, become thoroughly familiar with the work that has already been done to put philosophy on a mathematical basis. Your comments on work that is already taken seriously will be noticed.
 
  • #4
Just a reminder, we don't allow philosophy here.
 
  • #5
Evo said:
Just a reminder, we don't allow philosophy here.
At the risk of an infraction... In a graduate level Philosophy of Science course I received a B for a "BS" paper refuting Immanuel Kant using Einsteins special relativity theory. It really was "BS". Just sayin'
 
  • #6
Evo said:
Just a reminder, we don't allow philosophy here.


The boundary between philosophy and logic is not precise. For example, would you call Principia Mathematica math or philosophy? Would you call Frege's Foundations of Arithmetic math or philosophy? No one has a good answer to this question. But so as to satisfy you I will rephrase my OP:

I'm making some calculations in logic and I'm using a lot of invented notation and I'm hoping that it will make argument more mathematical but I'm often afraid no one will care about my calculations or bother to learn how to do them. Are you ever afraid that no one will care about your calculations? Do you ever plan on publishing proofs and worry that no one will bother to check your work?
 
  • #7
FactChecker said:
My two cents:
There have been some very good philosopher - mathematicians (Bertrand Russell comes to mind.) One thing that is critical for people to take you seriously, is for you to take them seriously. If you haven't already, become thoroughly familiar with the work that has already been done to put philosophy on a mathematical basis. Your comments on work that is already taken seriously will be noticed.


This is quite reasonable. Thanks for the input.
 
  • #8
dlgoff said:
At the risk of an infraction... In a graduate level Philosophy of Science course I received a B for a "BS" paper refuting Immanuel Kant using Einsteins special relativity theory. It really was "BS". Just sayin'

I think Kant is one of the worse Philosophers from the 1600 - 1850 period. He can't get anything right.
 
  • #9
This is going nowhere. Thread closed.
 
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1. What is the importance of my calculations?

Calculations play a crucial role in scientific research as they provide the necessary evidence and support for a hypothesis or theory. They allow for accurate measurements and predictions, and help to validate or disprove scientific claims.

2. How do I ensure that my calculations are accurate?

In order to ensure accuracy in calculations, scientists use precise instruments, follow standardized procedures, and double-check their work. They also conduct experiments multiple times to account for any potential errors.

3. What if my calculations do not match my hypothesis?

It is not uncommon for calculations to deviate from the expected results. This can be due to a variety of reasons such as human error, faulty equipment, or incomplete data. It is important to carefully analyze and evaluate the results to determine the cause of the discrepancy.

4. Can I trust my calculations to accurately represent the real world?

Calculations are based on scientific principles and mathematical equations, making them a reliable representation of the real world. However, it is important to consider the limitations and assumptions made in the calculations and to interpret the results accordingly.

5. How do I present my calculations to others?

In order to effectively communicate your calculations to others, it is important to provide clear and concise explanations, as well as visual aids such as graphs or tables. It is also important to provide the necessary context and background information for others to understand the significance of your calculations.

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