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At what angles aeroplanes moves

  1. Aug 8, 2005 #1
    hi i want to know at what angles aeroplenes move left and rights
    please if there is any equations related to this provide me
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 8, 2005 #2

    Danger

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    Hi zaman;
    I'm afraid there isn't nearly enough information in your question to know exactly what you mean, let alone help with answering it.
    What do you mean by 'moving at angles'? This could imply banking, wind drift, side-slipping, etc..
     
  4. Aug 8, 2005 #3

    russ_watters

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    If you mean banking, you can calculate it easily enough: The bank angle creates a triangle, with the vertical leg (vertical up from the plane) being 1G and, the perpendicular leg being the lift produced by the wing, and the horizontal being the g-force into the turn.
     
  5. Aug 8, 2005 #4

    EnumaElish

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    Wouldn't you have to know the type and the size of the airplane? Jet vs. prop., uniplane vs. biplane? Isn't it easier to start with kites and gliders?
     
  6. Aug 8, 2005 #5

    russ_watters

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    You'd have to know its specs to know how many g's it's capable of sustaining without tearing off the wings or stalling, but every plane will bank at the same angle for the same turn rate (in g's). It has to: if the vertical force does not equal the weight of the plane, the plane will go up or down.
     
  7. Aug 9, 2005 #6

    Danger

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    There is one thing that you haven't mentioned, zaman, which is the context of your question. Russ is absolutely correct from the purely physics standpoint. If, on the other hand, you intend to be flying the thing, you also have to factor in rudder co-ordination and throttle manipulation in order to maintain a constant turn.
     
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