Average Rate of Heat Gain in Fridge

In summary, the average rate of heat gain for a common fridge can be estimated by using the average power consumption of the refrigerator, the temperature of the refrigeration compartment, and the ambient temperature. By approximating the refrigerator as a Carnot Vapor Refrigeration Cycle, one can calculate the coefficient of performance and use it to determine the heat gain based on power input and efficiency. For example, for a refrigerator set at 35 degrees Fahrenheit and ambient temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit, with an average power consumption of 70 watts, the estimated heat gain would be around 1000 watts.
  • #1
Jacob87411
171
1
Just curious if anyone knows an approximate for the average rate of heat gain for a common fridge? I am going to do an experiment to calculate the average rate of heat gain in my fridge and want to know if my numbers in the ballpark
 
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  • #2
An average household fairly efficient refrigerator will use about 50 kWh per month.

According to this cost guide:

http://www.pse.com/solutions/pdfs/1236_RES_EnergyCostGuide.pdf"

That will maybe give you a starting point.
 
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  • #3
Jacob87411 said:
Just curious if anyone knows an approximate for the average rate of heat gain for a common fridge? I am going to do an experiment to calculate the average rate of heat gain in my fridge and want to know if my numbers in the ballpark

Did you ever find out? I'm trying to find out. Of course, the answer depends on the refrigerator (set point) temperature and the ambient temperature. Still, there should be a rule of thumb that requires only a) the temperature difference between the refrigerator and exterior and b) the refrigerator surface area.
 
  • #4
All you need is the average power consumption of the refrigerator, the temperature of the refrigeration compartment, and ambient temp. If you approximate the refrigerator as a Carnot Vapor Refigeration Cycle, you can calculate the coefficient of performance using just the temps:

[tex]\beta_{max}=\frac{T_{c}}{T_{h}-T_{c}}[/tex]

and using the coefficient of performance and the power input (with an efficiency for the the compressor, maybe 80%), the heat gain is calculated as:

[tex]\dot{Q}_{in}=\beta_{max}*\frac{\dot{W}_{c}}{\eta}[/tex]

So for a refrigerator holding at 35 degrees fahrenheit (275 K) and ambient of 75 degrees fahrenheit (297 K), with an average power consumption of 70 watts (50kWh per month), and assuming the power consumption is mainly from the compressor, the average heat gain would be about 1000 watts if I did the calcs right...
 
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  • #5


I cannot provide a specific answer to this question without knowing more details about your specific fridge and experimental setup. The rate of heat gain in a fridge can vary depending on factors such as the size and insulation of the fridge, the temperature and humidity of the surrounding environment, and the frequency of door openings. Additionally, the rate of heat gain can also be affected by the type and amount of food stored in the fridge.

To accurately calculate the average rate of heat gain in your specific fridge, I recommend conducting a controlled experiment where you measure the temperature inside the fridge at regular intervals over a set period of time. This will allow you to determine the rate of heat gain for your particular fridge and circumstances. It is also important to repeat the experiment multiple times to ensure accurate and consistent results.

Overall, while there may be general estimates for the average rate of heat gain in fridges, it is best to conduct your own experiment to determine the specific rate for your fridge. This will ensure the most accurate and reliable results.
 

Related to Average Rate of Heat Gain in Fridge

1. What is the average rate of heat gain in a fridge?

The average rate of heat gain in a fridge refers to the amount of heat that enters the fridge over a certain period of time. This can vary depending on factors such as the outside temperature, frequency of opening the fridge door, and the age and efficiency of the fridge.

2. How is the average rate of heat gain calculated?

The average rate of heat gain is calculated by measuring the change in temperature inside the fridge over a set period of time. This can be done by using a thermometer and recording the temperature at regular intervals. The difference in temperature divided by the time elapsed will give the average rate of heat gain.

3. Why is it important to know the average rate of heat gain in a fridge?

Knowing the average rate of heat gain in a fridge is important for maintaining food safety and preserving the quality of perishable items. If the rate of heat gain is too high, it can cause the fridge to work harder to maintain a cool temperature and may lead to spoilage of food. It can also impact the energy efficiency and lifespan of the fridge.

4. What are some common causes of a high average rate of heat gain in a fridge?

Some common causes of a high average rate of heat gain in a fridge include leaving the door open for extended periods of time, placing hot or warm items directly into the fridge, and having a malfunctioning or old fridge with poor insulation. Other factors such as the location of the fridge (e.g. near a heat source) and the frequency of use can also contribute to a high rate of heat gain.

5. How can the average rate of heat gain in a fridge be reduced?

To reduce the average rate of heat gain in a fridge, it is important to keep the fridge door closed as much as possible, especially in hot or humid environments. It is also recommended to let hot or warm items cool down before placing them in the fridge, and to regularly clean and maintain the fridge to ensure it is running efficiently. Additionally, keeping the fridge in a cool and well-ventilated area can also help reduce the average rate of heat gain.

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