1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Binding energy and favorable reactions

  1. Jun 21, 2016 #1
    [Moderator note: Thread moved from technical section, thus no template is shown]

    Hi everyone!
    I'm currently learning nuclear physics and I have a question:
    Watching the binding energy per nucleon curve, is the following reaction energetically favorable?
    2H + 4He -> 6Li
    And why?
    500px-Binding_energy_curve_-_common_isotopes.svg.png
    Thanks!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 21, 2016 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    Why don't you take the values from the diagram and check for yourself? Better (more accurate): Look up the binding energies (or the masses) and calculate it.
     
  4. Jun 21, 2016 #3
    The question asks to answer according to the curve :\
     
  5. Jun 21, 2016 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    I moved you to the homework section.

    Well, then use the diagram and check it.
     
  6. Jun 21, 2016 #5
    That's exactly my question... The binding energy of the 4He is bigger than the B.E of the product. Is that it? or is there something more?
     
  7. Jun 21, 2016 #6

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    What about the binding energy of deuterium?
     
  8. Jun 21, 2016 #7
    well it's smaller! and that is my question!
     
  9. Jun 21, 2016 #8

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    No, that is the homework question.

    What is the combined binding energy of D+4He?
     
  10. Jun 21, 2016 #9
    do you mean for 2H + 4He -> 6Li:
    2*1 MeV + 4*7MeV = 30MeV < 6*5.3 = 31.8 therefore the reaction is energetically favorable?
     
  11. Jun 21, 2016 #10

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    Sure.

    To conserve energy and momentum, you would need an additional photon in the final state.
     
  12. Jun 26, 2016 #11
    Thanks for the help! :)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Binding energy and favorable reactions
  1. Binding energy (Replies: 1)

  2. Binding energy (Replies: 6)

  3. Binding energy (Replies: 5)

Loading...