Blood transfusion

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

why don't the donor's antibodies(found in the transferred blood) attack the receiver's cells during blood transfusion?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
663
3
why don't the donor's antibodies(found in the transferred blood) attack the receiver's cells during blood transfusion?
If you have blood group A, your body doesn't produce antibodies against your own antigens. So blood group A person can transfer blood to another blood group A person. If you have blood group 0, you have no antigens on your cell membrane, so receiver would not attack you, if you are the donor. So you can give blood to everyone if you are O. So blood transfusion is closely matched to make sure what you are saying would not occur. Cheers :smile:
 
  • #3
If you have blood group A, your body doesn't produce antibodies against your own antigens. So blood group A person can transfer blood to another blood group A person. If you have blood group 0, you have no antigens on your cell membrane, so receiver would not attack you, if you are the donor. So you can give blood to everyone if you are O. So blood transfusion is closely matched to make sure what you are saying would not occur. Cheers :smile:
What i meant to ask is: suppose you are of blood group O, then your blood will contain antibodies ant-A and anti-B, if you transfer this blood to an individual (receiver) of blood group A for example, then would the antibodies anti-A in the donor's blood attack the receiver's RBC's of blood group A.
 
  • #4
663
3
What i meant to ask is: suppose you are of blood group O, then your blood will contain antibodies ant-A and anti-B, if you transfer this blood to an individual (receiver) of blood group A for example, then would the antibodies anti-A in the donor's blood attack the receiver's RBC's of blood group A.
Hey, that's a good question. Does a blood group 0 person develop antibodies for A and B, only if they are exposed to these antigens or it doesn't have to be that way? I'm not sure and also are only Red blood cells transferred in transfusions. Hopefully someone else who knows this can answer this.
 
  • #5
bobze
Science Advisor
Gold Member
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What i meant to ask is: suppose you are of blood group O, then your blood will contain antibodies ant-A and anti-B, if you transfer this blood to an individual (receiver) of blood group A for example, then would the antibodies anti-A in the donor's blood attack the receiver's RBC's of blood group A.
Like Sameer suggests, you'd only have those antibodies if you had prior exposures and even if you did your body wouldn't keep a constant circulating supply of them going (antigen specific antibodies are expensive to make, which is why our immune shuts down to "storage mode" after an immune response via memory cells).

We also use packed RBCs, which are red blood cells separated from whole blood. So the transfusion is really a nutrient solution containing the RBCs and none of the donor plasma (which is where the antibodies would be found).
 

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