Building An Infrared Remote To Control Triacs

In summary, the conversation discusses the building of an Infrared Remote to control a series of triacs and create a "remote control power bar." The original plan was to use push button switches but they did not work properly. The solution includes using a 4013 to trigger a MOC3011, which isolates the large AC voltages/currents. The person wants to use an infrared remote to send a clock pulse to the 4013 instead of directly triggering the MOC3011. They found a schematic on the internet but are facing difficulties with programming and do not have the necessary tools. One possible solution suggested is using a PIC or Arduino to control the project and looking for an interface circuit for IR remote controls.
  • #1
Lancelot59
646
1
Hey there PF!

I'm currently working on building an Infrared Remote to control a series of triacs. The objective is to create a "remote control power bar". The original plan was to use push button switches to toggle the Q lead of a 4013, each of which houses two switching circuits.

Q and NOT-Q toggle when CP receives a clock pulse. R is a reset so I can turn all of the circuits off at once.

The 4013 triggers a MOC3011, which isolates the 4013 from the large AC voltages/currents. Inside inside the 3011 is a LED and a photo-transistor. The LED gets turned on when Q goes high and in turn activated the photo-transistor. In turn the IC triggers a triac.

What I want to do is design the setup to work with either the touch-switches or be triggered by an infrared controlled setup.

Here is a schematic of the original circuit. I've crossed out the touch switches at the top because they didn't work properly. Now there is pair of resistors, a capacitor, and a schmit trigger that generate the clock pulse.

scan.jpg


What I'm thinking of doing is having the infrared remote send a clock pulse to the 4013 instead of directly triggering the MOC3011. That way I can still use physical switches if the remote fails.

I found this schematic on the internet:

tx.GIF

rx.GIF


The IC ULN2830 is a typo apparently, I think it's supposed to be 2803, which makes it a bunch of darlington pairs. I figure I can eliminate that and program the PIC to generate a clock pulse and trigger the 3014

Current Problems:
1. I don't have a programming board for the 14 pin PIC
2. I don't know how to write in PICBasic

Actually the same site that schematic is from (HERE) has some code for the transmitter and reciever, but I don't know how to modify it to do what I want.

Does anyone here have past experience with this?
 

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  • #3
I would use a PIC or an Arduino to do the control. It's worth learning more about it and putting the tools together for this and future projects, IMO.

You can still use an IR remote control to control the project, if that seems to be the best ergonomic choice here. Have you looked to see if there is an interface circuit for IR remote controls for the PIC or Arduino?
 

Related to Building An Infrared Remote To Control Triacs

1. How does an infrared remote control work?

An infrared remote control uses infrared light to transmit signals to a receiver, which then triggers an action, such as turning on or off a device. The remote control contains an infrared light emitter, typically an LED, which emits light in the infrared spectrum. The receiver, which is usually located on the device being controlled, detects the infrared light and interprets the signals to perform the desired action.

2. What are triacs and how do they work?

Triacs are electronic components that are used to control the flow of electricity to a load. They are similar to thyristors, but are designed to work with alternating current (AC) instead of direct current (DC). Triacs consist of three terminals, known as the gate, MT1, and MT2. When a small current is applied to the gate, the triac allows a larger current to flow between MT1 and MT2. This allows for precise control of the electricity flowing to a load, such as a light or motor.

3. What materials and tools are needed to build an infrared remote control for triacs?

To build an infrared remote control for triacs, you will need an infrared LED, a triac, a resistor, a breadboard, jumper wires, a battery, and a battery holder. You will also need basic tools such as wire cutters, wire strippers, and a soldering iron. Additionally, you will need a microcontroller or Arduino board to program the remote control.

4. Can I use a universal remote control to control triacs?

In theory, it is possible to use a universal remote control to control triacs. However, most universal remote controls are not designed to work with triacs and may not have the necessary programming capabilities. It is best to use a dedicated remote control specifically designed for controlling triacs, or to build your own using the proper components.

5. Are there any safety precautions I should take when building an infrared remote control for triacs?

Yes, whenever working with electricity, it is important to take proper safety precautions. This includes wearing protective gear, such as gloves and goggles, and ensuring that all components are properly wired and insulated. It is also important to disconnect all power sources before working on the circuit. If you are unsure about any aspect of building the remote control, it is best to consult a professional or do further research before proceeding.

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