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Butter me up!

  1. Sep 24, 2007 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    I just got this in an email and thought that it was a good one for scrutiny here at PF.

     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 24, 2007 #2
    Sounds like it was produced by someone with a vested interest in promoting butter. Here is another point of view
    Margarine
    perhaps biased the other way.

    My mother told me that margarine used to come with food coloring packaged separately. You would have to mix them together yourself if you wanted the yellow color. The butter industry had insisted on it.
     
  4. Sep 24, 2007 #3

    Evo

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  5. Sep 24, 2007 #4

    mgb_phys

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    I thought margarine was invented by the French to supply a long life butter to the armies.
    edit - In 1869 Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France offered a prize to anyone who could make a satisfactory substitute for butter, suitable for use by the armed forces.
     
  6. Sep 24, 2007 #5

    turbo

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    My wife and I have no margarine in the house, and cook with butter, olive oil, and peanut oil (for high-heat dishes). Deep-frying (infrequent) is best done with lard because you can use temperatures high enough to sear the food so the surface is crispy and retards the absorption of any more fat. We've been out of the trans-fat/hydrogenated food stream for years. Butter is the "secret ingredient" many French dishes and in simple steamed vegetable and herb dishes.
     
  7. Sep 24, 2007 #6

    Astronuc

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    I mostly use butter and olive oil.
     
  8. Sep 24, 2007 #7

    wolram

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    Beef dripping for me from now on.
     
  9. Sep 24, 2007 #8

    Moonbear

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    I've never liked the taste of margarine, and it isn't the right texture for baking, so I've never really used it and don't care if it's better or worse for you than butter, because I'm sticking with my butter.
     
  10. Sep 24, 2007 #9

    turbo

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    Our local dairy farmer raised Jerseys and Guernseys (not Holsteins!) so cream occupied the top 25-30% of each milk bottle. We would shake it up and drink it that way, but my grandmother always poured off most of the cream, and used it in coffee and with berries and cereal for my grandfather's breakfasts, and every few days, she'd make up a batch of fresh butter. When I visited them, I loved waking up to a breakfast of freshly baked tall, flaky biscuits with fresh salty butter, eggs, bacon, and maybe some left-over baked beans and home-fried potatoes. Mmm! No margarine or shortening in her house, either. Butter, salt pork, and lard.
     
  11. Sep 24, 2007 #10
    Butter is too hard to spread. When they make butter that's actually soft I'll switch. :)
     
  12. Sep 24, 2007 #11

    turbo

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    You don't keep butter refrigerated. You keep it at room temperature in a covered butter dish, and it stays fresh and soft for a very long time. If you want to refrigerate your spread and have it stay spreadable, then you're going to use tubs of spreadable thickened vegetable oil.
     
  13. Sep 24, 2007 #12

    Moonbear

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    Or you can just whip the butter to soften it in a hurry if you're not comfortable leaving it out. I usually just cut a few slices of butter off the stick and let them warm to room temp while I'm preparing whatever I'm eating (i.e., toasting the bread or baking the biscuits) so it's nice and soft when the food is ready for it.
     
  14. Sep 24, 2007 #13

    Evo

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    I use whipped butter. Even though the new margarines with zero trans fat and no cholesterol are healthier than butter, I eat such tiny amounts it doesn't matter. Seriously, who would eat so much butter that it would matter?
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2007
  15. Sep 24, 2007 #14

    turbo

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    Health-wise, consumption of butter vs margarine (in modest amounts) may not have a significant impact on one's well-being, but when taste and satisfaction is brought into the picture, butter kicks some serious butt. I'd be quite depressed if I could not have a little butter on my steamed sweet corn or buttercup squash or baked potato and had to settle for margarine. :yuck:
     
  16. Sep 24, 2007 #15

    DaveC426913

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    Everyone's a cook? Not one science geek among us?
     
  17. Sep 24, 2007 #16

    mgb_phys

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    i can only think of one non-cooking related use of butter, and that's film related.
     
  18. Sep 24, 2007 #17

    Evo

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    Cooking *is* science. :smile:

    Except for my youngest daughter, for her cooking is dumping a pouch of some pre-mixed thing into boiling water and stirring. She can cook salmon fillets, remarkably, and she only uses real butter (to keep this on topic).
     
  19. Sep 24, 2007 #18

    turbo

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    Well, I'm an optician, a process chemist, an amateur astronomer, and for the last few years, an observational astronomer exploiting publicly-accessible databases of images, spectroscopy, etc. I'd rather be known as the best damned cook in the Maine woods. :rofl:
     
  20. Sep 24, 2007 #19

    Mk

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    Rule 34 of science - “If you can imagine it, there is a recent Harvard study proving it.”
    I suppose near anything you swallow will do that.
    “Appeal to tradition”

    I can see it now:
    Code (Text):
    Table salt is but ONE ATOM away from being SODIUM!
    How would you like to put that in you boiling water before you add the pasta?
    Wait a second, butter is a fruit?
     
  21. Sep 24, 2007 #20
    I just don't like the way margarine feels on my tongue, feels waxy to me. I would half to agree with Turbo, its a must for good cooking. If I couldnt have it on my baked or mashed potatos, I wouldn't eat them.
     
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