Calculating Double Beta Decay Rates: Is It as Simple as Multiplying Two Values?

In summary, Aakash is trying to find the decay rate for 48Ca using double beta decay. He has acquired the values for G and M for 2ν decay, and is using these values to calculate the rate.
  • #1
Hey everyone,

I've learned about double beta decay and neutrinoless double beta decay recently. So we have two "conditions" for decay, 2v decay and 0v decay. Now, to the question I have:

There have been a lot of experiments measuring 2v decay rates, and there have been many experiments concerning a limit on Majorana mass for neutrinos in 0v decay. We have the following equation for 2v double beta decay rates:

(T 2v1/2)-1 = G2v | M2v | 2

Where G is the phase space factor and M is the nuclear matrix element.

So I've acquired this list of values that correspond to the G and M values for 2ν Double Beta Decay values, and I am calculating the rate for the 2v Decay of 48Ca:

M value (Nuclear Matrix Element): ~0.05
(G2v)-1 value: 9.7 X 1016 y x MeV-2

So my question is, in order to acquire the decay rate, do all I need to do is multiply these values? I know it seems silly to ask, but please bear with me. I am a high school student who is learning all of this physics for the first time (at a college), it just seems a little crazy that it could just be as simple as that :smile:

Thank you in advance!
-Aakash Sunkari
 
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  • #2
Do you get the correct units that way? If not, there is something missing.
This is a very useful thing to check in general. It doesn't help with dimensionless constants, but they are not that common.
 
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  • #3
mfb said:
Do you get the correct units that way? If not, there is something missing.
This is a very useful thing to check in general. It doesn't help with dimensionless constants, but they are not that common.

Thank you for your quick reply! I'll calculate it later today, and update this thread on my results.
 

1. What is double beta decay?

Double beta decay is a nuclear process in which an unstable atom decays into a more stable atom by emitting two electrons and two anti-neutrinos.

2. How is double beta decay different from single beta decay?

Single beta decay involves the emission of only one electron and one anti-neutrino, while double beta decay involves the emission of two electrons and two anti-neutrinos.

3. What is the rate of double beta decay?

The rate of double beta decay is determined by the half-life of the process, which is the time it takes for half of the unstable atoms to decay into stable atoms. The half-life can vary greatly depending on the specific nucleus undergoing double beta decay.

4. Why is the study of double beta decay important?

The study of double beta decay can provide insights into the fundamental properties of neutrinos, which are elusive particles that play a crucial role in our understanding of the universe. It can also shed light on the nature of matter and antimatter.

5. How do scientists measure double beta decay rates?

Scientists measure double beta decay rates by conducting experiments using specialized detectors that can detect the emission of electrons and anti-neutrinos. They also use sophisticated mathematical models to analyze the data and determine the half-life of the process.

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