Calculating Force Needed to Push Water Through a Hose

In summary, to determine the force needed to push water through a hose, use Bernoulli's equation to find the difference in pressure at two points. The velocity at both points will be the same as the cross sectional area does not change. Convert the units to meters and then calculate the net pressure using the formula PA=F. Remember, F/A=P. To find the minimum force needed, calculate the weight of a column of water 1 square meter in area and 40cm high, which will give the answer in pascals.
  • #1
Unlockitall
6
0
I was wondering if someone could tell me a formula for how much force is required to push water through a hose. I am going to try to figure out how much force is needed to push water vertically 40 cm through 5/16 inch tubing.
 
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  • #2
You will need to use Bernoulli's equation to find the difference in pressure at the two points. Note that the velocity at both points is the same as the cross sectional area does not change. After you have the difference in pressure, that will give you the "net pressure". Now remember that PA=F. Net pressure you calculated and area is just pi * r^2.

Just make sure to convert the units into meters before you plug the numbers in.
 
  • #3
Without information about how much velocity you want, the only calculation we can do is with height. I'll leave that pressure calculation to you...you should try to figure it out on your own, but we can help if you get stuck.
 
  • #4
Im not trying to get any particular pressure. All I am trying to find is the least amount needed to force the water through and up.
 
  • #5
Unlockitall said:
Im not trying to get any particular pressure. All I am trying to find is the least amount needed to force the water through and up.

Remember, F/A = P.

So if you find the pressure, you will find the force.
 
  • #6
Calculate the weight of a column of water 1 square meter in area and 40cm high and you'll have the answer (in pascals).
 

Related to Calculating Force Needed to Push Water Through a Hose

1. How do you calculate the force needed to push water through a hose?

To calculate the force needed to push water through a hose, you will need to know the pressure of the water and the cross-sectional area of the hose. The formula for force is force = pressure x area. So, you can simply multiply the water pressure by the area of the hose to determine the force needed.

2. What is the unit of measurement for force when calculating water pressure?

The unit of measurement for force when calculating water pressure is Newtons (N). This is the standard unit for force in the International System of Units (SI).

3. How does the diameter of the hose affect the force needed to push water through it?

The diameter of the hose has a direct impact on the force needed to push water through it. A larger diameter hose will have a larger cross-sectional area, which means the force needed will be less compared to a smaller diameter hose. This is because the force is distributed over a larger area in a larger diameter hose.

4. Can the force needed to push water through a hose be increased?

Yes, the force needed to push water through a hose can be increased by increasing the pressure of the water or by using a smaller diameter hose. Additionally, friction within the hose can also affect the force needed, so reducing any obstructions or bends in the hose can also increase the force needed.

5. Are there any other factors that can affect the force needed to push water through a hose?

Aside from water pressure, cross-sectional area, and friction, there are other factors that can affect the force needed to push water through a hose. These include the length of the hose, the viscosity of the water, and the temperature of the water. These factors can all impact the resistance within the hose and therefore affect the force needed to push the water through.

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