Calculating Reaction Force: Box on Rigid Wall with Applied Force of 100 N

In summary, the wall exerts a force of 100 N in reaction to the force you applied, resulting in a static friction of μN.
  • #1
spectrum123
19
0
Imagine a box of mass "M" lying on a surface and attached to a rigid wall too. Assuming that the co-efficient of friction between them(box and surface of ground) is "μ". and I am applying a force of 100 N horizontally on the box. So my question is how mush force is being applied by the wall on the box as a reaction force.
 
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  • #2


You push towards the wall? There are multiple solutions, and it will depend on the geometry of your setup (where do you apply the force, how does the mass distribution of the box look like, and so on).
 
  • #3


spectrum123 said:
Imagine a box of mass "M" lying on a surface and attached to a rigid wall too. Assuming that the co-efficient of friction between them(box and surface of ground) is "μ". and I am applying a force of 100 N horizontally on the box. So my question is how mush force is being applied by the wall on the box as a reaction force.

I don't quite follow you, since in the end you are not so interested in the friction but rather the force the wall exerts?

Anyway, I will try to answer with what I understand. Please clarify if this is not what you meant. The box is not moving, so it is in equilibrium. Considering all the forces in the horizontal direction, you get:

F[itex]_{1}[/itex]=F[itex]_{f}[/itex]+F[itex]_{2}[/itex]
where F[itex]_{1}[/itex] is the force you exert and F[itex]_{2}[/itex] is the force the wall exerts. Note: Above F only concerns the magnitude, so we are ignoring direction for now.

You know Friction is μN and N has the same value as the weight (not mass) of the box. And F1 is 100N. So you just simply subtract the magnitude of the friction from 100N. That's the value of the force exerted by the wall.
 
  • #4


Byron Chen said:
You know Friction is μN and N has the same value as the weight (not mass) of the box.
Realize that μN is the maximum possible value of static friction between the surfaces. The actual value can range from 0 to that maximum. As mfb says, there is not enough information to get a single answer.
 
  • #5


Doc Al said:
Realize that μN is the maximum possible value of static friction between the surfaces. The actual value can range from 0 to that maximum. As mfb says, there is not enough information to get a single answer.

Good point I almost forgot. Guess I'm too used to problems dealing with kinetic friction.
 

1. What is "Force Applied to Box: 100 N"?

"Force Applied to Box: 100 N" refers to the amount of force or strength that is being used to push or pull a box with a measurement of 100 Newtons (N).

2. How is force applied to a box measured?

Force applied to a box is measured using a unit called Newtons (N). This is a unit of measurement for force that is equivalent to the amount of force needed to accelerate a mass of 1 kilogram at a rate of 1 meter per second squared.

3. Why is it important to know the force applied to a box?

Knowing the force applied to a box is important because it helps determine the amount of work that is being done on the box. It also helps determine the amount of force needed to move or lift the box, as well as the amount of force the box can withstand before breaking or deforming.

4. How does the amount of force applied affect the box?

The amount of force applied to a box can affect it in several ways. If the force applied is greater than the weight of the box, it will cause the box to accelerate in the direction of the force. If the force applied is equal to the weight of the box, the box will remain stationary. If the force applied is less than the weight of the box, the box will decelerate in the direction opposite to the force.

5. Can the force applied to a box be changed?

Yes, the force applied to a box can be changed by either increasing or decreasing the amount of force being applied. This can be done by using different tools or techniques, adjusting the angle or direction of the force, or changing the weight or mass of the box.

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