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Can anyone graph this?

  1. Oct 24, 2004 #1
    r(t)= <t^2, cost, sint>

    Does anyone have a graphing program to make a picture of this, thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2004 #2

    graphic7

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    What kind of range are you looking for?

    I assume this is a vector field?
     
  4. Oct 24, 2004 #3
    its a curve of that function. I'm not sure on the range, I guess just enough to show the pattern. I believe it is a cos sin circle coming out the x axis.
     
  5. Oct 24, 2004 #4

    graphic7

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  6. Oct 24, 2004 #5

    Tom Mattson

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    The implied range is that x>0, and that y and z must both be between -1 and 1 (inclusive). I don't have a graphing utility handy, but what I would do is find the 2D curve in each coordinate plane by eliminating the parameter. So, in the xy plane, you have y(x)=arccos(x1/2), in the xz plane you have z(x)=arcsin(x1/2), and in the yz plane you have y2+z2=1.

    Basically, the curve is constrained to the unit cylinder y2+z2=1, and as it goes around it moves forward on the x-axis, starting from x=0.
     
  7. Oct 24, 2004 #6

    graphic7

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    My plot seems to agree.
     
  8. Oct 24, 2004 #7

    graphic7

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    If you need a larger range, just request it.
     
  9. Oct 24, 2004 #8

    Tom Mattson

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    There is no larger range. The implied range that I stated is the maximal range.
     
  10. Oct 24, 2004 #9

    graphic7

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    Only in the y and z directions, though. I just replotted from 0 to 1000 and you really get to see the unit cyclinder take form.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2004
  11. Oct 24, 2004 #10

    Tom Mattson

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    Ah, I see what you're saying. You mean a larger range in your picture. What I was saying is that the range implied by the equations is the maximal range, and that if there is any modification to that range in the problem, it can only be smaller, not bigger.
     
  12. Oct 24, 2004 #11

    graphic7

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    Ah, sorry for the confusion.
     
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