1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Can be force computed this way?

  1. Jul 30, 2015 #1
    It is well known that
    force (f) = acceleration (a) X mass (m)

    Can I say that actually:
    f = a X m X b X e X d X r
    where
    b = e = d = r = 1?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 30, 2015 #2

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Mathematically you can since multiplying by one doesn't change the result, but physically it wouldn't make much sense. What are those letters supposed to represent?
     
  4. Jul 30, 2015 #3
    The computation would be more "accurate" if you used the formula
    [tex] f=ma \sqrt{br} d^e[/tex] where again b=d=e=r=1.:wink::smile:
     
  5. Jul 31, 2015 #4
    Well, the right wording of the questions is, are all physics formulas complete and absolute?!.

    If the formulas are derived from observing a physical event occurring multiple times with a fixed trend, then basically, we can assume that we are only observing changing factors, while there are many other static or unchanging factors that were held constant in all the times that we were observing that we didn't observe.


    If the math doesn't conflict with the previous assumption, then we might need to revise all our understanding of physics and try to answer questions like "how many such variable are there? why are they constant? can we change them? what will happen if we change them?"
     
  6. Jul 31, 2015 #5
    That is too complex for future students. Let just keep it all in one line :wink::smile:
     
  7. Jul 31, 2015 #6

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Assuming that unobserved effects are occurring makes little sense. It greatly complicates things and serves no useful purpose.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Can be force computed this way?
  1. How to compute a force (Replies: 1)

Loading...