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Can someone show the steps?

  1. Nov 9, 2005 #1
    how to go from: [(1+n)^n]/n to: (1+1/n)^n ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 9, 2005 #2

    quasar987

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    It's not true.
     
  4. Nov 9, 2005 #3
    Do you mean:

    [tex]\lim_{n\to\infty}\left(1+\frac{1}{n}\right)^{n}=\lim_{n\to 0}\left(1+n\right)^{\frac{1}{n}}.[/tex]
     
  5. Nov 9, 2005 #4
    [​IMG]
    You can check if you can get to a another equation by substuting values into 'n'.
    Regards,
    Sam
     
  6. Nov 9, 2005 #5
    Well, that doesn't always work (checking by substituting values). It's easy enough to show using algebra rules anyways.
     
  7. Nov 9, 2005 #6
    Its true that it doesn't always work, but it is a quick method of proving something doesn't equate.
     
  8. Nov 11, 2005 #7
    Sorry, that's what I meant. Can you show me how you get to the right hand expression?
     
  9. Nov 11, 2005 #8

    matt grime

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    you realize you're asking for someone to explain why (1+2)/2 = 1/2 +2/2, or more generally that (a+b)/c = (a/c)+(b/c), which is something you learn in primary/elementary school, right?
     
  10. Nov 11, 2005 #9
    Oh, dear god... I can't believe I could be THAT silly :bugeye:

    Of course I see it, my incredible dull brain was confused by the n's, probably.

    Anyways, sorry for bothering you with this. That was rather embarrassing...
     
  11. Nov 14, 2005 #10

    quasar987

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    You just got grimed! :surprised Ouch.
     
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