Can we see individual stars in the Andromeda Galaxy?

In summary, the conversation discusses the ability to see stars in the Andromeda Galaxy through telescopes, particularly the Hubble Space Telescope. It is confirmed that individual stars in Andromeda can be observed and studied, with the Hubble's record for precision being 0.0003 arc-seconds. However, it is noted that most of the individual stars visible in the unzoomed image are actually foreground stars in our own galaxy.
  • #1
Stephanus
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Dear PF Forum,
Just out of curiosity :smile:
Can we (through telescope or HST for example) see stars in Andromeda Galaxy?
Is the Andromeda Galaxy the closes galaxy to us. Can we really be sure that there is no other galaxy across Milky Way because our line of sight is blocked by clusters of stars in Milky Way.

Thanks.
 
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Yes, until Edwin Hubble, nobody were Andromeda was. He correctly identified a cepheid variable on it's otter rim. He could do it in the early 1900, now high power telescopes, it's fairly easy.
 
  • #4
Do you mean HST can spot individual stars in Andromeda, as we say observe Vega, 26 ly away?
 
  • #5
Stephanus said:
Do you mean HST can spot individual stars in Andromeda, as we say observe Vega, 26 ly away?
Yes, in fact, you can see some of the brightest in this 1.5 billion pixel image: http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic1502a/zoomable/

The big ones are much closer Milky Way stars, but when you zoom in, you can see individual stars in Andromeda itself.

How much detail they can study them in is obviously no where near the ability to look at close stars but it's certainly possible to pick out individual ones.Hubble's record for precision is 0.0003 arc-seconds according to Wikipedia, to put that in context, that's the width of a dime held a distance of more than 3000 miles.
 
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newjerseyrunner said:
Yes, in fact, you can see some of the brightest in this 1.5 billion pixel image: http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic1502a/zoomable/

The big ones are much closer Milky Way stars, but when you zoom in, you can see individual stars in Andromeda itself.

How much detail they can study them in is obviously no where near the ability to look at close stars but it's certainly possible to pick out individual ones.Hubble's record for precision is 0.0003 arc-seconds according to Wikipedia, to put that in context, that's the width of a dime held a distance of more than 3000 miles.
Wow!
If I don't know PF Forum better, I'd say this is a computer generated software.
:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
Ok, my curiosity fullfiled.
 
  • #7
Stephanus said:
Do you mean HST can spot individual stars in Andromeda, as we say observe Vega, 26 ly away?
newjerseyrunner said:
Yes, in fact, you can see some of the brightest in this 1.5 billion pixel image: http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic1502a/zoomable/

The big ones are much closer Milky Way stars, but when you zoom in, you can see individual stars in Andromeda itself.

I am pretty sure it's safe to say that almost ALL the individual stars visible in the UNZOOMED image are foreground stars in our galaxy
 
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davenn said:
I am pretty sure it's safe to say that almost ALL the individual stars visible in the UNZOOMED image are foreground stars in our galaxy
Certainly so.
 

Related to Can we see individual stars in the Andromeda Galaxy?

What is Andromeda and why is it significant in astronomy?

Andromeda is a galaxy located about 2.5 million light years away from Earth. It is significant in astronomy because it is the closest spiral galaxy to our own Milky Way and provides important information about the evolution and structure of galaxies.

How many stars are estimated to be in Andromeda?

It is estimated that Andromeda contains around 1 trillion stars. This makes it one of the largest galaxies in our local group.

Can we see individual stars in Andromeda with the naked eye?

No, individual stars in Andromeda cannot be seen with the naked eye. However, the entire galaxy can be seen as a faint smudge in the night sky under dark conditions.

What types of stars are commonly found in Andromeda?

Andromeda contains a wide variety of stars, including young hot stars, older cool stars, and even some exotic stars like neutron stars and black holes. It also has a significant number of red giant stars, which are nearing the end of their lives.

How do we study stars in Andromeda?

We can study stars in Andromeda using a variety of techniques, such as telescopes, spectroscopy, and astrometry. We can also use computer simulations to model the dynamics and evolution of stars in the galaxy.

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