Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets

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  • #1
marcus
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this was posted today on arxiv
by Geoff Marcy, Paul Butler, and team (usual exoplanet people)

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0607493

The abstract has links to ONLINE exoplanet catalogs
some or all of which may be already familiar.

Online exoplanet catalogs are not new.
However this one is a preprint of an updated catalog to be published soon in the Astrophysical Journal. Presumably it has some new stuff---statistics, charts etc.---and the layout may be more suitable for printing off than what one finds online.
 

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  • #2
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Thank you.
 
  • #3
Astronuc
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The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia
http://exoplanet.eu/index.php

Latest news :

08 September : TrES-2: The First Transiting Planet in the Kepler Field

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrES-2
http://exoplanet.eu/planet.php?p1=TrES-2 [Broken]

Massive Planet Found by Astronomers Using Novel Network of Tiny Telescopes
http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/press/pr0623.html [Broken]
Cambridge, MA - Our home solar system may be down by a planet with the recent demotion of Pluto, but the number of giant planets discovered in orbit around other stars continues to grow steadily. Now, an international team of astronomers has detected a planet larger than Jupiter that orbits a star 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Draco.

Unlike the mythological names associated with the solar system's planets, the newly discovered planet is known by "TrES-2" and passes in front of the star "GSC 03549-02811" every two and a half days!

26 August : A 4th planet in the HD 160691 system (Gozdiewski et al; Pepe et al.)

15 July : 5 new planets: HD 164922 b , HD 66428 b, HD 99109 b , HD 107148 b and HIP 14810 b (Butler et al. 2006)
 
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  • #5
Astronuc
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It's about time this got updated.

Astronomers find new planets, including a baby
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Astronomers using robotic cameras said on Wednesday they had found 10 new planets outside our solar system, while a second team said they had found the youngest planet yet.

The findings add to a growing list of more than 270 so-called extrasolar planets, they told a meeting of astronomers in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The robot team is called "SuperWASP," for Wide Area Search for Planets, and the cameras look for planets transiting, or crossing in front of, their stars. The light from the sun fades just slightly when this happens, and astronomers can extrapolate the size and location of the planet.

Most planets around other stars have been found using a different method, measuring the tiny tugs that a planet makes on its sun's gravitational field.

Don Pollaco of Queen's University in Belfast and colleagues used banks of cameras in Spain's Canary Islands, South Africa, Arizona, Hawaii, Chile, France and Australia to discover the 10 new extrasolar planets.

The planets range in mass from half the size of Jupiter to more than eight times the size of Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. One orbits its sun once a day and is so close that its daytime temperature could reach about 4,200 degrees Fahrenheit (2,300 degrees Celsius).

Jane Greaves of the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and colleagues said they found a baby planet while using radio astronomy to examine a disk of gas and rocky particles around the star HL Tau.

This star is thought to be young, also -- 100,000 years old compared to our 4.6 billion-year-old Sun.

. . . .
 
  • #6
Astronuc
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Earth-like planets common?

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - European researchers said on Monday they discovered a batch of three "super-Earths" orbiting a nearby star, and two other solar systems with small planets as well.

They said their findings, presented at a conference in France, suggest that Earth-like planets may be very common.

"Does every single star harbor planets and, if yes, how many?" asked Michel Mayor of Switzerland's Geneva Observatory. "We may not yet know the answer but we are making huge progress towards it," Mayor said in a statement.

The trio of planets orbit a star (HD 40307) slightly less massive than our Sun, 42 light-years away towards the southern Doradus and Pictor constellations. A light-year is the distance light can travel in one year at a speed of 186,000 miles a second, or about 6 trillion miles.

The planets are bigger than Earth -- one is 4.2 times the mass, one is 6.7 times and the third is 9.4 times.

They orbit their star at extremely rapid speeds -- one whizzing around in just four days, compared with Earth's 365 days, one taking 10 days and the slowest taking 20 days.

Mayor and colleagues used the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher or HARPS, a telescope at La Silla observatory in Chile, to find the planets.

. . . .
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080616/sc_nm/space_planets_dc [Broken]

Press release from ESO - http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/press-rel/pr-2008/pr-19-08.html [Broken]
 
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  • #7
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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080616.wsuperearth0616/BNStory/Science/home [Broken]
here is another article

I read the yahoo one this morning it states that the star is 42 light years away for 6 trillion miles. However light travels 5.88 trillion miles in one year (9.5 trillion km) according to the defintion of a light year. http://www.answers.com/topic/light-year?cat=technology. The author of the article must have made a typo because 6 million miles seems to little. To get the distance you would multliply 42 light years by 5.88x10^12 which is 2.4696x10^14 or about 246 trillion miles. Not really that important i was just trying to do some calculations an estimate how long it would take a spacecraft such as Voyager 1 or 2 to reach the system haha :rofl:
 
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  • #8
baywax
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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080616.wsuperearth0616/BNStory/Science/home [Broken]
here is another article

I read the yahoo one this morning it states that the star is 42 light years away for 6 trillion miles. However light travels 5.88 trillion miles in one year (9.5 trillion km) according to the defintion of a light year. http://www.answers.com/topic/light-year?cat=technology. The author of the article must have made a typo because 6 million miles seems to little. To get the distance you would multliply 42 light years by 5.88x10^12 which is 2.4696x10^14 or about 246 trillion miles. Not really that important i was just trying to do some calculations an estimate how long it would take a spacecraft such as Voyager 1 or 2 to reach the system haha :rofl:

Hi, yeah that's a nice look at "super earths"

Astronomers report finding barren star orbited by trio of 'super-Earths'

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/080616/science/science_super_earths [Broken]

These finds are said to be upping the chances of life elsewhere by manyfold. They said its a "crowded universe"!
 
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  • #9
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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080616.wsuperearth0616/BNStory/Science/home [Broken]
here is another article

The author of the article must have made a typo because 6 million miles seems to little. QUOTE]

oops the article actually said 6 trillion
 
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  • #10
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Sorry if this does not quite fit the topic of the thread, but it might be of interest to you exoplanet buffs:

http://arxiv.org/abs/0808.2754

A proposed strategy for searching for exoplanets during the next 15 (!) years.
 
  • #11
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I find the number of planets our astronomoers have discovered in the last decade quite amazing, most of them right within our own nieghborhood, yet we havent even broke the skin yet in terms of the whole cosmos.
 
  • #12
Astronuc
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List of planets get longer - 12 in the last two months.

http://planetquest.jpl.nasa.gov/atlas/atlas_search.cfm [Broken]

One can sort by column category.
 
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  • #13
marcus
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That's a neat catalog. You put a check in the "terrestrial" box, and then click on "update search" and you get the list filtered down to just the dozen or so that this catalog classifies as terrestrial exoplanets.

Terrestrial in the sense of having mass or size the same order of magnitude as earth---e.g. like seven earth masses. Not surprisingly, the dozen or so that it considers terrestrial have all been discovered recently since detection techniques have only recently improved enough to pick up such small planets.

About some of these the information appears uncertain or incomplete. I clicked on some of those in the list but didn't find any that were prospects for habitable besides the one at Gliese 581 we talked about earlier.
 
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Hey, thanks for posting those papers up guys :)
I have a problem, I am trying to find this paper:
Marcy et al. 2005b, ApJ, 619, 570 'Five new planets'
I can usually find other papers online without trouble but this one eludes me. I have had a decent look but a null result :( If any of you could offer some suggestions or links I would be very thankful
 
  • #16
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Update: I found it. yes yes!
 
  • #17
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Sorry if this does not quite fit the topic of the thread, but it might be of interest to you exoplanet buffs:

http://arxiv.org/abs/0808.2754

A proposed strategy for searching for exoplanets during the next 15 (!) years.
And many thanks for this post!!!!
 
  • #18
Astronuc
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Astronomers have found 32 new planets outside our solar system bringing the total up to more than 400!
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091019/ap_on_sc/us_sci_new_planets [Broken]

http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/press-rel/pr-2009/pr-39-09.html [Broken]
 
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  • #19
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Just wondering, why exactly is knowing where planets are etc. means... Like most of the planets are only 'assumed' anyways. We won't ever travel to them I think so why can't we just accept the fact that other systems exist in the universe possibly with life?

I remember looking up salary information for different careers and astronomer was among the highest... I don't feel any of this information justifies it.
 
  • #20
Kurdt
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Just wondering, why exactly is knowing where planets are etc. means... Like most of the planets are only 'assumed' anyways. We won't ever travel to them I think so why can't we just accept the fact that other systems exist in the universe possibly with life?

I remember looking up salary information for different careers and astronomer was among the highest... I don't feel any of this information justifies it.

Why do we bother researching anything? Planets are not 'assumed', they are indirectly detected using various techniques. I fail to see the point you are making.
 
  • #21
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Why do we bother researching anything? Planets are not 'assumed', they are indirectly detected using various techniques. I fail to see the point you are making.

We research things for a variety of reasons. I'm wondering what the reason for researching this in particular is and that I think it's a waste of time and resources.
 
  • #22
Kurdt
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Other than expanding the knowledge of the human race, which is a noble cause in itself, it satisfies a curiosity that many people have shared for millenia. Are there other planets in other star systems. The answer now is yes. Expanding on that we may ask "are there other planets like Earth?". That is planets capable of supporting life because they inhabit the 'Goldilocks zone' in their parent stars orbit. It will help us determine if the Earth is truly unique and also help us speculate on whether there could be other life forms out there beyond our solar system.

Perhaps for me though, the most important thing that exoplanets have highlighted has been the inadequacy of the classic model of ordered solar system formation. If we had not discovered the exoplanets we had that model would still be what we use today.

I guess your major gripe is how all this helps people on the planet Earth. I couldn't tell you that, but i value the knowledge we gain from this type of research. Many others do too. In a similar direction oe could probably question the immediate value for the human race of a lot of research into astronomy.
 
  • #23
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I guess your major gripe is how all this helps people on the planet Earth. I couldn't tell you that, but i value the knowledge we gain from this type of research. Many others do too. In a similar direction oe could probably question the immediate value for the human race of a lot of research into astronomy.

This is true however I feel alot of time and resources have been spent searching for these planets... like we found them NOW what? I'm sure that before we began searching for planets we already assumed that our planetary system was not the only one. How can we find out if there is life on one of these distant planets? Can we even use equipment we have now to be able to see the surface of the planets within our solarsystem from earth or in orbit around earth?
It also has to do with the salary I saw that astronomers earn making this their career. I like astronomy and I enjoy reading as much as I can even about the exoplanets... but I feel like we know their there lets move on now.
 
  • #24
Kurdt
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This is true however I feel alot of time and resources have been spent searching for these planets... like we found them NOW what? I'm sure that before we began searching for planets we already assumed that our planetary system was not the only one. How can we find out if there is life on one of these distant planets? Can we even use equipment we have now to be able to see the surface of the planets within our solarsystem from earth or in orbit around earth?
It also has to do with the salary I saw that astronomers earn making this their career. I like astronomy and I enjoy reading as much as I can even about the exoplanets... but I feel like we know their there lets move on now.

In the near future thanks to nulling interferometry, we should be able to directly image planets. We can then do spectroscopy on the atmospheres and compare them to those of Earth to see if there are any similar life forms.

I can't comment with regards to salaries.
 
  • #25
baywax
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I can't comment with regards to salaries.

Let me try, if there's celery growing there its probably got rabbits!
 

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