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Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets

  1. Jul 23, 2006 #1

    marcus

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    this was posted today on arxiv
    by Geoff Marcy, Paul Butler, and team (usual exoplanet people)

    http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0607493

    The abstract has links to ONLINE exoplanet catalogs
    some or all of which may be already familiar.

    Online exoplanet catalogs are not new.
    However this one is a preprint of an updated catalog to be published soon in the Astrophysical Journal. Presumably it has some new stuff---statistics, charts etc.---and the layout may be more suitable for printing off than what one finds online.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 27, 2006 #2
    Thank you.
     
  4. Sep 9, 2006 #3

    Astronuc

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    The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia
    http://exoplanet.eu/index.php

    Latest news :

    08 September : TrES-2: The First Transiting Planet in the Kepler Field

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrES-2
    http://exoplanet.eu/planet.php?p1=TrES-2

    Massive Planet Found by Astronomers Using Novel Network of Tiny Telescopes
    http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/press/pr0623.html
    26 August : A 4th planet in the HD 160691 system (Gozdiewski et al; Pepe et al.)

    15 July : 5 new planets: HD 164922 b , HD 66428 b, HD 99109 b , HD 107148 b and HIP 14810 b (Butler et al. 2006)
     
  5. Sep 9, 2006 #4
  6. Apr 2, 2008 #5

    Astronuc

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    It's about time this got updated.

    Astronomers find new planets, including a baby
     
  7. Jun 16, 2008 #6

    Astronuc

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    Earth-like planets common?

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080616/sc_nm/space_planets_dc

    Press release from ESO - http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/press-rel/pr-2008/pr-19-08.html
     
  8. Jun 17, 2008 #7
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080616.wsuperearth0616/BNStory/Science/home
    here is another article

    I read the yahoo one this morning it states that the star is 42 light years away for 6 trillion miles. However light travels 5.88 trillion miles in one year (9.5 trillion km) according to the defintion of a light year. http://www.answers.com/topic/light-year?cat=technology. The author of the article must have made a typo because 6 million miles seems to little. To get the distance you would multliply 42 light years by 5.88x10^12 which is 2.4696x10^14 or about 246 trillion miles. Not really that important i was just trying to do some calculations an estimate how long it would take a spacecraft such as Voyager 1 or 2 to reach the system haha :rofl:
     
  9. Jun 18, 2008 #8

    baywax

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    Hi, yeah that's a nice look at "super earths"

    Astronomers report finding barren star orbited by trio of 'super-Earths'

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/080616/science/science_super_earths

    These finds are said to be upping the chances of life elsewhere by manyfold. They said its a "crowded universe"!
     
  10. Jun 18, 2008 #9
  11. Aug 21, 2008 #10
    Sorry if this does not quite fit the topic of the thread, but it might be of interest to you exoplanet buffs:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/0808.2754

    A proposed strategy for searching for exoplanets during the next 15 (!) years.
     
  12. Aug 22, 2008 #11
    I find the number of planets our astronomoers have discovered in the last decade quite amazing, most of them right within our own nieghborhood, yet we havent even broke the skin yet in terms of the whole cosmos.
     
  13. Oct 31, 2008 #12

    Astronuc

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  14. Oct 31, 2008 #13

    marcus

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    That's a neat catalog. You put a check in the "terrestrial" box, and then click on "update search" and you get the list filtered down to just the dozen or so that this catalog classifies as terrestrial exoplanets.

    Terrestrial in the sense of having mass or size the same order of magnitude as earth---e.g. like seven earth masses. Not surprisingly, the dozen or so that it considers terrestrial have all been discovered recently since detection techniques have only recently improved enough to pick up such small planets.

    About some of these the information appears uncertain or incomplete. I clicked on some of those in the list but didn't find any that were prospects for habitable besides the one at Gliese 581 we talked about earlier.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2008
  15. Oct 31, 2008 #14

    baywax

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  16. Oct 31, 2008 #15
    Hey, thanks for posting those papers up guys :)
    I have a problem, I am trying to find this paper:
    Marcy et al. 2005b, ApJ, 619, 570 'Five new planets'
    I can usually find other papers online without trouble but this one eludes me. I have had a decent look but a null result :( If any of you could offer some suggestions or links I would be very thankful
     
  17. Oct 31, 2008 #16
    Update: I found it. yes yes!
     
  18. Oct 31, 2008 #17
    And many thanks for this post!!!!
     
  19. Oct 19, 2009 #18

    Astronuc

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  20. Oct 19, 2009 #19
    Just wondering, why exactly is knowing where planets are etc. means... Like most of the planets are only 'assumed' anyways. We won't ever travel to them I think so why can't we just accept the fact that other systems exist in the universe possibly with life?

    I remember looking up salary information for different careers and astronomer was among the highest... I don't feel any of this information justifies it.
     
  21. Oct 19, 2009 #20

    Kurdt

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    Why do we bother researching anything? Planets are not 'assumed', they are indirectly detected using various techniques. I fail to see the point you are making.
     
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