Chile Mine Rescue: Is There a Braking Mechanism?

  • Thread starter BNAZN
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In summary, the 14 miners who were rescued from the mine in Chile are brought to the surface. They are happy and relieved and are thankful for the help they received from NASA.
  • #1
BNAZN
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I've been following up on the rescue efforts and everything but have not seen if there is a braking mechanism on the rescue pod. One that would installed if the cable broke. Does anyone know if there is? My idea would be either a free-fall stopper, one that would expand around the pod and shaft when the weight of the cable was release. Or a magnetic one since some of the shaft has had a sheet metal tube installed.
 
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  • #2
Steel cables in new condition almost never break. The half inch steel rope on the capsule can hold several hundred tons, and it will have a second rope any - just in case.

The capsule is a fairly close fit inside a tube with stabiliser wheels, it would only drop a few metres before wedging itself sideways - it's always very difficult to lower an object down a tight tube without it wedging when you don't want it to.
 
  • #3
The design constraints for this type of thing are a lot different from consumer products. For consumer products, the time available to design and prototype the product is a lot longer and safety is a much higher priority. For something like this, the lack of testing makes complexity work against safety since the miners are already in a life-and-death situation and safety features that add complexity also increase the chances of failure.
 
  • #4
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  • #5
They're up to about 20, and going strong...
 

Related to Chile Mine Rescue: Is There a Braking Mechanism?

1. What was the cause of the Chile mine collapse?

The Chile mine collapse was caused by a geological phenomenon known as a "rockburst," which occurs when stress and pressure in the surrounding rock exceeds its strength and causes it to fracture and collapse.

2. How did the miners survive for so long underground?

The miners were able to survive for 69 days underground due to a combination of factors. They had access to emergency supplies of food and water, and they also had a designated safe area where they were able to gather and conserve resources. Additionally, they were able to communicate with the surface through a small borehole and receive psychological support from the surface team.

3. What was the role of the braking mechanism in the mine collapse?

The braking mechanism was not directly responsible for the mine collapse. It was a safety feature designed to prevent the elevator from falling in the event of a power outage or malfunction. However, its failure to engage properly during the collapse may have contributed to the severity of the situation.

4. How did the rescue team drill a hole to reach the miners?

The rescue team used a specialized drilling rig called the Strata 950 to create a narrow borehole that was just wide enough to fit a rescue capsule. This process was complicated by the unstable and rocky terrain, but the team was able to carefully navigate through it and successfully reach the miners.

5. What safety measures have been implemented in mines since the Chile mine collapse?

The Chile mine collapse prompted increased attention to mine safety and stricter regulations in many countries. Some specific measures that have been implemented include improved communication systems, more thorough risk assessments, and better emergency response plans. Additionally, there has been a greater emphasis on psychological support for miners and their families in the event of a crisis.

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