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Classes other than math and physics

  1. Jun 22, 2013 #1

    462chevelle

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    does anyone find classes boring that aren't related to math and physics. like right now im taking psych and it seems like I cant focus when I study like I can with math or physics. right now I have an 86. and I want to at least maintain a 4.0 my first 2 years of college. for when I get some bs later on. I can tells classes like computer ap and public speaking are going to bore me to death. any advice on studying these kinds of subjects?
     
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  3. Jun 22, 2013 #2

    eri

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    No, I found my other classes interesting as well as my physics and math classes. I liked to learn in general. Not to mention that's where I learned my research, writing, and communications skills, all necessary skills for scientists. Advise? Figure out why you're taking those classes in the first place. It's for overarching skill sets you need to develop.
     
  4. Jun 22, 2013 #3

    462chevelle

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    right, that makes sense. I guess I just need to change my attitude. I just feel like some of the classes im going to have to take like music type classes. are just a waste of time off work or money. nothing I can do about taking them though
     
  5. Jun 22, 2013 #4
    My roommate described it best, I think. If you get deep enough in a subject, try hard enough, you will find the deepness of understanding reveals patterns that a casual apathy would not. Physics and math are intensely analytic, but in a way simpler than the softer subjects. There's always an answer and a pretty straightforward interpretation, or so it seems. If you can handle math and physics imagine what insights you could have in psychology, imagine what perspective you can elucidate in your public speaking classes. You have absolutely nothing to lose by mastering classes you are not interested in. Being well rounded does not dull your edge.
     
  6. Jun 23, 2013 #5

    lisab

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    I found I like classes that are *completely* removed from science, like sculpture or dance. I could just disconnect my analytical thinking and enjoy them for what they are.
     
  7. Jun 23, 2013 #6

    QuantumCurt

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    I love classes that aren't math or physics. I'm a person with very diverse interests though. I took intro to the humanities last semester, which was basically a technical art analysis course. It was fascinating, and I'll definitely never look at art the same way. I've found that I have a really deep interest in sociology, and I'm really excited about the two anthropology courses I'm taking next year. I love my GenEd's. You've just gotta research all of your options and find the ones that appeal to you.

    A lot of people share your feeling, in that their GenEd's are irrelevant, and don't matter in the long run. The point of college though, is not to train you for a career. The point is to educate you, and that education involves a broad range.
     
  8. Jun 23, 2013 #7
    Couldn't agree more. Knowledge is a beautiful asset.
     
  9. Jun 23, 2013 #8

    Choppy

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    Yes there is.

    Once you're out of the standard high school curriculum, your education is in your own hands. You choose the institution you attend for post-secondary education - if any. You chose the program you take. You chose the electives within that program.

    It's important to remember this. No one's forcing you to take these courses.

    Of course you're not going to enjoy a course if you feel like it's being forced on you. So try to take on the point of view that you've chosen that course as a part of the package deal.

    Another thing that helps is to really maximize these options. If you have to take a humanities elective, what about a history of science, or science and religion course. If you have a chance to take a philosophy of science, that can be real challenge if they really get into logic. Arts courses don't have to be confined to music. You mentioned a public speaking course... this can be invaluable for someone in academia. Just about all academic job interviews involve giving some kind of presentation. Or what about learning another language? You may not enjoy it, but it might open up some doors for you down the road.
     
  10. Jun 25, 2013 #9

    462chevelle

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    thanks. guys ill try to keep a more open mind and have a better attitude about the other classes. I guess its not the end of the world taking classes like that. I guess the other day I was just upset about the grade I have from lack of interest.
     
  11. Jul 3, 2013 #10

    462chevelle

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    just wanted to update. just changing my attitude of the class I got a 104 on my test today. thanks for the advice.
     
  12. Jul 3, 2013 #11

    QuantumCurt

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    Nice! Good job!

    Having a positive attitude can make all the difference in the world. As others have said, you shouldn't view it as something you're being forced to do. As college students, we've all made the choice to go to college. Taking classes that aren't part of your primary field of study are just part of the package.
     
  13. Jul 3, 2013 #12

    symbolipoint

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    Some yes and some no.


    The lectures of some courses outside of math & physics (and other sciences) can seem imprecise. You should and can organize what you study from these other classes, especially since the math and physics forces you to handle highly systematic and organized information, sometimes expecting you yourself to study how something is organized. Other than just the non-scientific material, you have the opportunity to find how other people, the non-scientific types, think and how they not think or how they think differently than your scientific peers.

    Just try an introductory economics course some time after two or three or four years of hardcore sciences and mathematics. Just a simple linear graph is difficult for some of your fellow students there. This is rare stuff for them; but no problem for you
     
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