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B Collision of Two Objects on Ice

  1. Mar 21, 2016 #1
    hi, I apologize if this question is placed in the wrong area. I was not sure where it belonged. Can someone please help me with the following:

    Assuming the ice is very smooth, like that of your standard indoor hockey arena, how much much would an object have to weigh to remain stationary when hit with a 6oz puck traveling 100mph? 75mph? 50mph? and 25mph?

    I don't know if it matters, but the object being struck would smooth on the surface that touches the ice, and would be 72 inches wide, 4 inches deep, and 4 inches tall.

    Thank you in advance for any and all help you're able to provide! I appreciate you taking the time!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 21, 2016 #2

    haruspex

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    What conservation laws are you aware of that might be appropriate?
     
  4. Mar 21, 2016 #3
    None! Sorry, but I am clueless in this field. I am a youth hockey coach trying to create a tool to use in a drill to help develop young players.
     
  5. Mar 21, 2016 #4

    PeroK

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    Your problem can only be solved by gathering some data from your set-up and then you can apply some physics. The main factor is how much your object will grip the ice (this is called the coefficient of friction). There is no theorectical way to determine this. You would have to measure this quantity - in the same way that you have to measure the weight of your object and the weight of the puck.
     
  6. Mar 21, 2016 #5

    A.T.

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    Friction on ice is complicated, and the static friction might even depend on how long the object was standing on the ice. The max force in collision is also not easy to determine accurately. So as others said, you have to try it out.
     
  7. Mar 21, 2016 #6

    haruspex

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    One thing that should improve your chances of its staying put is to have a rubber or cloth band around it. That will spread the impulse over a longer period, reducing the peak force.
     
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