Common emitter transistor configuration

In summary, the grounding of the emitter in common emitter transistor configuration allows for a path for the base and collector currents to return to the negative supply, resulting in a current gain from the base to the emitter and a large voltage gain at the collector. Grounding the emitter also allows for the emitter to serve as the source of both the base and collector electron currents in an NPN transistor.
  • #1
amaresh92
163
0
would you please tell me,in common emitter transistor configuration what is the use of grounding the emitter?
thanks
 
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  • #2


The emitter doesn't have to be actually grounded, but it has to have a path for the base current and collector current to return to the negative supply (for an NPN transistor ) as emitter current.

Is that what you meant?
Or were you comparing it to the alternative of having an emitter resistor and then grounding that?
 
  • #3


vk6kro said:
The emitter doesn't have to be actually grounded, but it has to have a path for the base current and collector current to return to the negative supply (for an NPN transistor ) as emitter current.

Is that what you meant?
Or were you comparing it to the alternative of having an emitter resistor and then grounding that?

actually i don't have any idea why and when we ground any terminal as it seems to be in the case of ce configuration.
 
  • #4


In the CE (common emitter) configuration, the base is the input and the output is the collector. There is a current gain from the base to the emitter, and a large voltage gain at the collector into a large load resistance when the emitter is grounded. In an npn transistor, the emitter is the source of both the base and collector electron currents when it is grounded.

Bob S
 
Last edited:

Related to Common emitter transistor configuration

1. What is a common emitter transistor configuration?

A common emitter transistor configuration is a type of transistor circuit where the emitter terminal is connected to ground and the input signal is applied to the base terminal. The output signal is taken from the collector terminal.

2. What are the advantages of using a common emitter transistor configuration?

Some advantages of using a common emitter transistor configuration include high voltage gain, high input impedance, and the ability to amplify both AC and DC signals. It also allows for easy biasing and can be used in a wide range of applications.

3. How does a common emitter transistor configuration work?

In a common emitter transistor configuration, the input signal at the base terminal causes a small change in the base current, which in turn causes a larger change in the collector current. This amplification is due to the transistor's ability to control the flow of current between the collector and emitter terminals.

4. What are the limitations of using a common emitter transistor configuration?

Some limitations of using a common emitter transistor configuration include low power efficiency, high output impedance, and the potential for thermal runaway. It also requires careful biasing and can be susceptible to noise and instability.

5. How is the current gain calculated in a common emitter transistor configuration?

The current gain, also known as the beta (β) value, can be calculated by dividing the collector current (IC) by the base current (IB). This value can vary depending on the specific transistor used and the operating conditions, but is typically in the range of 50-200.

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