Computational Physics Courses for Engineering Students

In summary, an engineering student who is transitioning to physics is seeking advice on courses to take in order to become proficient in modeling physical phenomena. The suggested courses include physics and applied computing, as well as a differential equations modeling course. It is also mentioned that one can learn necessary skills through self-study and on-the-job experience. The conversation then shifts to a question about finding the force exerted by a rope on a bucket of water, with clarification needed on whether to use the normal force or subtract the force of gravity.
  • #1
Necross
34
0
Hi All. I'm an engineering student switching over to physics. I was wondering what would be some of the courses that I would have to take if I wanted to get proficient at crudely modeling physical phenomenon...e.g collapse of a proto solar disk...formation of planets, impacts of comets etc...

Here is the list of courses:

http://www.ucalendar.uwaterloo.ca/0809/COURSE/course-PHYS.html" .
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Take as many of the Physics courses as you can. As for the others, the applied computing courses are as much a plus. The differential equations modeling course looked interesting.

My PhD is in computational modeling in semiconductors, I took exactly one Fortran course and learned the rest on my own.

If you have the drive, you'll learn what you need to know and if and when you go to grad school, you'll learn by doing, not just coursework.
 
  • #3
Thanks Dr. Transport :) Yeah I was wondering the same thing. That course is definitely on my to do list. Just a couple more terms :D
 
  • #4
Hello everyone,

I'm having a doubt with my Physics homework. I need somebody's help!

To find the force exerted by the rope on a bucket of water that is raised from a well I have to find the normal force (m*A upward accelaration of the bucket) and that is the one or I should find the force of gravity (m*G) and substracted from the normal force and that is the force exerted by the rope?

Thankss
 

Related to Computational Physics Courses for Engineering Students

1. What is computational physics?

Computational physics is the use of computer modeling and simulation techniques to solve complex physical problems. It involves the use of numerical methods and algorithms to study physical systems and phenomena that are difficult to solve analytically.

2. Why is computational physics important for engineering students?

Computational physics is important for engineering students because it provides them with a powerful tool for solving real-world problems in their field. It allows them to simulate and analyze complex systems that would be too difficult or time-consuming to study with traditional methods, and can aid in the design and optimization of engineering systems.

3. What topics are typically covered in a computational physics course for engineering students?

Topics commonly covered in a computational physics course for engineering students include numerical methods, programming languages, data analysis and visualization, modeling and simulation techniques, and applications in various fields of engineering such as mechanics, electromagnetism, and thermodynamics.

4. What skills can engineering students expect to gain from a computational physics course?

Engineering students can expect to gain a variety of skills from a computational physics course, including proficiency in programming languages such as Python or MATLAB, the ability to apply numerical methods to solve complex problems, and experience with data analysis and visualization. They will also develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are valuable in any engineering discipline.

5. Are there any prerequisites for taking a computational physics course as an engineering student?

Prerequisites for a computational physics course may vary depending on the institution, but typically include a solid understanding of calculus, linear algebra, and introductory physics concepts. Some programming experience may also be beneficial, but is not always required.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
24
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
803
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Back
Top