Constant in Modes of Optical Fiber

In summary, the conversation is about a problem with measuring the mode fields of optical fiber at the core-cladding interface for modes LP01 and LP11. The speaker is looking for a formula or source to help determine the normalization constants for these modes, but has found conflicting information and is getting erroneous results. Claude mentions that the normalization constants are derived from the boundary conditions for a specific fiber geometry. The speaker asks for clarification and any possible formulas or sources for the LP01 and LP11 modes.
  • #1
Dear All,
Many thanks for reading this query. Actually, I am having problem in measuring the mode fields of Optical fiber at the core-cladding interface analytically for modes LP01 and LP11. The modes are normally given by eq 2.165 (image attached).

To my knowledge these constants A and C are Normalization constants to make the power in the mode equal to 1. But how to measure these Normalization constants. Is there any formula to measure them for LP01 and LP11 mode. Any sources will be highly appreciated.

I checked one source and found the formulas in attached images Eq A.9 and A.5 (where he defines LP11 mode by eq 4.9 in some way normalized again) but when I measure value with these Normalization coefficients I get answer in range of 10^6 (definately there is something wrong) I will be helpful if someone can figure out some error or can give some guideline.

Many Thanks again..
 

Attachments

  • modes.png
    modes.png
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  • LP11mode.png
    LP11mode.png
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  • Normalization constant.png
    Normalization constant.png
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  • #2
The normalization constants are derived from the boundary conditions for a given fiber geometry.

Claude.
 
  • #3
Many thanks for your humble reply. I used the Normalization constant calculated for step index fiber LP11 mode (shown in figure) but the values are in range of 10^6 and later i use them for measuring smthng and get erronous results...Kindly inform me are there any formulas for LP01 and LP11 modes or any good source. If possible kindly inform me about the typical values.

Many Thanks in advance.
 

1. What is the Constant in Modes of Optical Fiber?

The constant in modes of optical fiber, also known as the V-number, is a measure of the relative speed of light through the fiber core compared to the speed of light in a vacuum. It is used to characterize the number of modes or paths that light can take through the fiber.

2. How is the Constant in Modes of Optical Fiber calculated?

The V-number is calculated by taking the ratio of the refractive index of the fiber core to the refractive index of the cladding, and multiplying it by the core radius. This calculation takes into account the optical properties of the fiber and its physical dimensions.

3. Why is the Constant in Modes of Optical Fiber important?

The V-number is important because it determines the number of modes that can propagate through an optical fiber. This, in turn, affects the bandwidth and data-carrying capacity of the fiber. A higher V-number means more modes and therefore a higher bandwidth potential.

4. How does the Constant in Modes of Optical Fiber affect signal degradation?

The V-number can affect signal degradation in multimode fibers, where different modes travel at different speeds and arrive at the end of the fiber at different times. This can cause signal distortion, known as modal dispersion, which can limit the maximum distance over which the signal can travel without significant degradation.

5. Can the Constant in Modes of Optical Fiber be changed?

The V-number is a fundamental property of the fiber and cannot be changed once the fiber is manufactured. However, by carefully choosing the fiber core and cladding materials, manufacturers can control the V-number and optimize it for different applications and performance requirements.

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