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Control Theory

  1. Nov 15, 2015 #1
    upload_2015-11-15_13-31-2.png
    Hi,
    Is this Bode diagram tells that the system is stable? As I see it is, because of the φ>0. What doest it mean that the upper diagram has two zero-crossing?
     

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  3. Nov 15, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    Hi dave :welcome:

    I see ##\phi < 0## up to very high frequencies

    What's the stability criterion in your context ? The amplitude never runs off to infinity, so you may well be right ...
     
  4. Nov 15, 2015 #3
    upload_2015-11-15_14-32-9.png
    Thank you for your respons!
    As you see in the picture, the second zero crossing defines a phase, which is -90 and according to the stabilty criteria it is stable because -90>-180. Is it correct?
     
  5. Nov 15, 2015 #4
    upload_2015-11-15_14-49-18.png
    This is the step-respons diagram of the same system. Its stabel. So the Bode should be also stable, but i m not sure.
     

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  6. Nov 15, 2015 #5

    BvU

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    I think you are right. This looks like a second order system with a ##\zeta## of about 0.3.

    Apparently your criterion is ##\ \phi > 180^\circ\ ## when |response/input| = 1 which I don't really recognize. Your call.
     
  7. Nov 15, 2015 #6

    FactChecker

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    Yes. It has what is called 90 degrees of "phase margin" at that frequency because 180-90 = 90. All lower frequencies have more phase margin. The higher frequencies have what is called "gain margin" because the gain for those frequencies is less than 1. So it is well within the stable region at all frequencies, as you can see by the damping of the step input signal.
    PS. Usually the gain margin of a system is defined as the margin at the frequency where the phase shift is -180. In this system, there is no frequency like that.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2015
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