Conversion between kV and keV?

  • Thread starter tica86
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  • #1
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Can anyone tell me the conversion between kV and keV??

Thank you!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
125
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V is used for electromotive force, eV is energy and actually means the energy gained by an electron moving through a 1 V potential difference. So you can't really convert between the two. Perhaps it would be more useful to picture V = J/C, and then you can see the connection.
 
  • #3
79
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V is used for electromotive force, eV is energy and actually means the energy gained by an electron moving through a 1 V potential difference. So you can't really convert between the two. Perhaps it would be more useful to picture V = J/C, and then you can see the connection.
Oh ok, there was just a problem that my professor did the question was a potential 12.00kV is used to produce x-rays. (A) what is the minimum wavelength possible for the x-rays?
------He started by doing 12.00kV to 12.00keV=

12.00* (1.602175*10^-16J)=1.9222*10^-15 J so that's why I was confused with the 12.00, I understand the conversion to J.
 
  • #4
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Ah, ok, so your professor was showing you what energy to expect if you put an electron through a 12kV potential.
 
  • #5
79
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Ah, ok, so your professor was showing you what energy to expect if you put an electron through a 12kV potential.
Oh ok so whatever number given in kV will always be the same for keV???
 
  • #6
79
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Oh ok so whatever number given in kV will always be the same for keV???
since your just showing what energy to expect if you put an electron through a kV potential?
 
  • #7
125
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For something that carries a charge equivalent to one electron. The charge is important for the transition, since you are multiplying coulombs by joules per coulomb to find joules. It's just that an electron volt can be seen as a particular amount of joules. It's an ease of use thing, since energy expressed in eV is so much easier to deal with in particle physics, et al.
 
  • #8
79
0


For something that carries a charge equivalent to one electron. The charge is important for the transition, since you are multiplying coulombs by joules per coulomb to find joules. It's just that an electron volt can be seen as a particular amount of joules. It's an ease of use thing, since energy expressed in eV is so much easier to deal with in particle physics, et al.
Oh ok, got it. Thank you!!
 

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