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I Cooling the Parker Solar Probe

  1. Jul 8, 2018 #1
    This probe is designed to fly closer than 4 million miles from the sun's 'surface'. Is it possible in principle to cool the spacecraft's inner facing surface by transferring heat to a cooler part and then radiating it into space from the far surface? I don't think it is equipped with such tech but it would be cool if it was.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 8, 2018 #2

    Bystander

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    Sounds like a great exercise in "inverse square law" and "black-body" behavior to me; can you let us, PF, know what you come up with?
     
  4. Jul 8, 2018 #3

    Dale

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    Yes. In principle it is possible to transfer heat throughout the probe so that it is roughly at the same temperature throughout. The rate of heating or cooling then depends on the principles of radiative heat transfer
     
  5. Jul 8, 2018 #4

    berkeman

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    Maybe the probe will be rotating, continuing to turn a different side toward the Sun?
     
  6. Jul 9, 2018 #5
    Can we make the assumptions that I want the spacecraft to have a main instrument chamber kept as cool as desired for a reasonably long time, and that it might be necessary to keep the craft with one side facing the sun (or a solution might require a rotation). So, to put numbers on it, if the near surface reaches 1,700 K the solution should require (1) the coolest part to kept at 300 K or (2) the coolest part to be kept at 3.5 K either until (a) the internal fuel runs out or (b) indefinitely.
     
  7. Jul 9, 2018 #6

    davenn

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    why make wild assumptions about the craft ??

    All the main info is on the NASA site for you to read .... here's the main guts of the heat shielding .....

    July 6, 2018

    Cutting-Edge Heat Shield Installed on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe
    The launch of Parker Solar Probe, the mission that will get closer to the Sun than any human-made object has ever gone, is quickly approaching, and on June 27, 2018, Parker Solar Probe’s heat shield — called the Thermal Protection System, or TPS — was installed on the spacecraft.

    A mission 60 years in the making, Parker Solar Probe will make a historic journey to the Sun’s corona, a region of the solar atmosphere. With the help of its revolutionary heat shield, now permanently attached to the spacecraft in preparation for its August 2018 launch, the spacecraft’s orbit will carry it to within 4 million miles of the Sun's fiercely hot surface, where it will collect unprecedented data about the inner workings of the corona.

    upload_2018-7-10_12-26-53.png

    The eight-foot-diameter heat shield will safeguard everything within its umbra, the shadow it casts on the spacecraft. At Parker Solar Probe’s closest approach to the Sun, temperatures on the heat shield will reach nearly 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit, but the spacecraft and its instruments will be kept at a relatively comfortable temperature of about 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

    The heat shield is made of two panels of superheated carbon-carbon composite sandwiching a lightweight 4.5-inch-thick carbon foam core. The Sun-facing side of the heat shield is also sprayed with a specially formulated white coating to reflect as much of the Sun’s energy away from the spacecraft as possible.

    The heat shield itself weighs only about 160 pounds — here on Earth, the foam core is 97 percent air. Because Parker Solar Probe travels so fast — 430,000 miles per hour at its closest approach to the Sun, fast enough to travel from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., in about one second — the shield and spacecraft have to be light to achieve the needed orbit.


    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddar...shield-installed-on-nasa-s-parker-solar-probe

    Dave
     
  8. Jul 10, 2018 #7

    berkeman

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    Wow! That's amazing. Do you know the expected/projected lifetime in solar orbit?
     
  9. Jul 10, 2018 #8

    davenn

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    wellllllll ....
    the best I have so far found is this ....
    https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/parker-solar-probe-humanity-s-first-visit-to-a-star

    And I'm not completely sure how to interpret that ?
    It sounds like...
    1) it does 7 loops around the Sun and Venus and each of those loops brings it closer during those 7 years or
    2) it uses Venus once as a boost to initially get it into a closer 7 year solar orbit ( where it doesn't loop around Venus any more )

    I'm sort of going for #1, but am not sure ?

    Dave
     
  10. Jul 10, 2018 #9

    davenn

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    OK from wiki .....

    so #1 in previous post is the plan


    my bold = WOW


    D
     
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