Could Excited Baryon decay into omega meson and baryon?

In summary, there are many excited baryons that can undergo several decays, including decays to photons and ground state baryons. The possibility of an excited baryon decaying into an omega meson and a ground state baryon has been discussed, but further research is needed to determine the likelihood of this process occurring. Some research has been done on the radiative decay of excited baryons, but there is currently no clear connection between strong and weak interactions in this area. The production of omega mesons in high-energy heavy ion collisions has been studied, and their decays have been found to be an important signal for understanding the hot and dense medium created in these collisions.
  • #1
zhangyang
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Excited baryon could decay into photon and ground state baryon,but could it decay into omega meson and ground state baryon?Could you introduce me some articles about it,experimental or theoretical?
 
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  • #2
There are many excited baryons. Which one are you talking about?
 
  • #3
There are excited baryons that can undergo several decays...
If the conservation laws are satisfied then the decay can exist...
Take for example the [itex]\Delta^+[/itex] baryon which is an excited proton, and it decays to proton via:
[itex] \Delta^+ \rightarrow p + \pi^0 [/itex]
(no photon)

So I don't see why there can't be an omega-meson participating in such processes. The only problem of omega, in comparison to pions, is its large mass...
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50 said:
There are many excited baryons. Which one are you talking about?

Could any excited baryon decay into ? Even One,I want to search its information.If it exist,which one is most likely to occur?
 
  • #5
ChrisVer said:
There are excited baryons that can undergo several decays...
If the conservation laws are satisfied then the decay can exist...
Take for example the [itex]\Delta^+[/itex] baryon which is an excited proton, and it decays to proton via:
[itex] \Delta^+ \rightarrow p + \pi^0 [/itex]
(no photon)

So I don't see why there can't be an omega-meson participating in such processes. The only problem of omega, in comparison to pions, is its large mass...

From theoretical respect,yes.But every unstable particle has its favorate mode of decay,so we could at last determine it through experiment.Has that process been discovered ?
 
  • #6
Then I'd say omega meson is not a favorite decay mode, due to its large mass (small phase space relative to others).
Or are you referring to the Delta+ decay I wrote? Then it's 1 of the 2 most common decays of the Delta+ baryon , and the one that results in a proton [un-excited state] product...
 
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  • #7
The N(1875), provided that it is real, has a 20% branching fraction to omega + N.
 
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  • #8
There are multiple mesons called ##\omega##. I guess we are talking about the lightest one at 782 MeV.
You can look through the decay modes of http://pdg8.lbl.gov/rpp2014v1/pdgLive/Viewer.action . You'll see that a large variety of baryons has reasonable branching ratios with an omega meson. Most of those particles are so short-living that their widths overlap, and you cannot clearly identify the origin of each omega meson individually.
##\Lambda_c^+## has a 1.2% chance to decay to ##\Lambda \pi^+ \omega##. While this might be a rare production mode, the long lifetime of the mother particle can be interesting.

What do you want to do/know?
 
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  • #9
Vanadium 50 said:
The N(1875), provided that it is real, has a 20% branching fraction to omega + N.
Thank you,I will search it in PDG carefully.So heavy a meson.
Somebody say that J/ψ→excited B + antiB + excited(antiB) + B → ω + B + antiB could occur,(B point to baryon),I feel surprised,because I think J/ψ and ω is in an same generation,but in the process above ,former is the mother's mother of latter,so I want to determine the truth.
Further more, radiative decay should emit photon,could Omega be called radiation?
 
  • #10
ChrisVer said:
Then I'd say omega meson is not a favorite decay mode, due to its large mass (small phase space relative to others).
Or are you referring to the Delta+ decay I wrote? Then it's 1 of the 2 most common decays of the Delta+ baryon , and the one that results in a proton [un-excited state] product...

The mechanism is weak interaction? Maybe, to research the hadron decay ,one always has to treate weak interaction,perhaps it implies the connection between Strong and Weak interaction.
Thank you.
 
  • #11
mfb said:
There are multiple mesons called ##\omega##. I guess we are talking about the lightest one at 782 MeV.
You can look through the decay modes of http://pdg8.lbl.gov/rpp2014v1/pdgLive/Viewer.action . You'll see that a large variety of baryons has reasonable branching ratios with an omega meson. Most of those particles are so short-living that their widths overlap, and you cannot clearly identify the origin of each omega meson individually.
##\Lambda_c^+## has a 1.2% chance to decay to ##\Lambda \pi^+ \omega##. While this might be a rare production mode, the long lifetime of the mother particle can be interesting.

What do you want to do/know?

Someone researched the radiative decay of excited baryon ,which is from the decay of J/ψ:
J/ψ→excited B + antiB + excited(antiB) + B → photon + B + antiB ,
use the partial wave analysis to abtain the quantum amplitude of process,and the branch ratio ,other thought that the photon could be replaced by Omega,and the process could also occur,I suspect it,that is it.
 
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  • #12
If you expect us to have a discussion on this, it would be helpful to know who this "somebody" is, and where it was published.
 
  • #13
zhangyang said:
The mechanism is weak interaction? Maybe, to research the hadron decay ,one always has to treate weak interaction,perhaps it implies the connection between Strong and Weak interaction.

It can be a strong interaction.
There is hardly any connection between strong and weak interactions at this stage.
 
  • #14
In my research field of high-energy heavy-ion collisions, plenty of omega mesons are created. The light vector mesons (##\rho##, ##\omega##, and ##\phi##) play a very important role in understanding the findings on "dileptons". Dileptons are simply electron-positron or muon-antimuon pairs. Plenty of those are created in a heavy-ion collision, and taking their invariant-mass spectra measures a quantity called the electromagnetic current-current correlation function of hadrons.

That's a very interesting signal to learn about the hot and dense medium created in high-energy heavy ion collisions, because the leptons (and also photons) don't take part in the strong interaction, and thus for them the hot and dense medium is transparent, i.e., the dileptons do not suffer final-state interactions but come out of the hot and dense fireball pretty undistorted and thus give a signal from the hot and dense interior.

Among the mechanisms to create dileptons in such collisions are also the decays of the light vector mesons, and thus by measuring the dilepton's invariant-mass spectra you can find out something about the change of the spectral properties of the light vector mesons. It turns out that models that predict a large broadening of the spectral function with quite small mass shifts describe all the data at a large varieties of collision energies pretty accurately.

In turn this tells as something about the mechanism underlying the restoration of the (approximate) chiral symmetry of the light-quark sector in QCD: It's a "melting of the resonances", i.e., the resonances become very broad around the transition between a hot and dense hadron gas and a state of matter, called the "Quark Gluon Plasma", which consists of a strongly coupled gas (or liquid?) of quarks and gluons. For a pretty recent review, see, e.g.,

R. Rapp, J. Wambach, H. van Hees, The Chiral Restoration Transition of QCD and Low Mass Dileptons
Landolt-Börnstein, Volume I/23, 4-1 (2010)
arXiv: 0901.3289 [hep-ph]
 
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  • #15
Vanadium 50 said:
If you expect us to have a discussion on this, it would be helpful to know who this "somebody" is, and where it was published.

I upload the article.But I haven't know the complete formalism of partial wave analysis,so I want to get a initial paper on this,do you have ?
 
  • #16
I'd not post a copyrighted paper in a publicly available forum. I'm not sure, whether the APS is strict about this, but it can get expensive. In HEP that's not necessary anyway, because usually everything is also posted to arXiv, and that's the case also here:

http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/0210164
 
  • #17
vanhees71 said:
I'd not post a copyrighted paper in a publicly available forum. I'm not sure, whether the APS is strict about this, but it can get expensive. In HEP that's not necessary anyway, because usually everything is also posted to arXiv, and that's the case also here:

http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/0210164

Yes,I want to delate the article I upload,How could I operate?
 
  • #18
I deleted the attachment.
 

1. Can excited baryons decay into omega mesons and baryons?

Yes, excited baryons can decay into omega mesons and baryons through the strong interaction force.

2. What is an excited baryon?

An excited baryon is a subatomic particle made up of three quarks that are in a higher energy state than the ground state.

3. How does the decay of excited baryons into omega mesons and baryons occur?

The decay of excited baryons into omega mesons and baryons occurs through the emission of a virtual gluon, which then breaks up into a pair of quarks. One of these quarks combines with the remaining quark from the original baryon to form the omega meson, while the other quark combines with the other two quarks to form a new baryon.

4. What is an omega meson?

An omega meson is a subatomic particle composed of three quarks, specifically two strange quarks and one down quark. It is a member of the meson family of particles and is classified as a vector meson.

5. Why is the decay of excited baryons into omega mesons and baryons important?

The decay of excited baryons into omega mesons and baryons can provide important information about the strong interaction force and the behavior of quarks within baryonic particles. Studying this decay can also help us better understand the structure and composition of matter at a fundamental level.

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