Decrease in Density of Water with Increase in Soap Concentration

In summary, the density of normal water is 1 gm/cm cube and the density of soap water is 0.9 gm/cm cube. Adding soap or detergent to water decreases its density. It is unclear if the density of soap water decreases gradually or remains constant at 0.9 gm/cm cube as the concentration of soap increases. There is no known graph showing the relationship between soap concentration and water density.
  • #1
M.Kalai vanan
32
0
density of normal water -1 gm/cm cube and density of soap water -0.9 gm/cm cube.

We know that the addition of soap or detergent decreases the density of water.
Thus If we keep on increasing the concentration the soap in the water does the density of water decreases gradually or remains constant at 0.9 gm/cm cube.
If available please provide the graph between Increase in concentration of soap and Decrease in density of water
 
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  • #2
Hi Kalai,

At 0 % soap - density of water
At 100% soap - density of soap

The density of all other mixtures should be linear, although it can be that at some mixtures the overall packing is more or less favorable and the graph is curved in or out.

I do not know of any graph for these specific values.

Have fun!
 
  • #3
M.Kalai vanan said:
density of soap water -0.9 gm/cm cube.

Define "soap water".
 

Related to Decrease in Density of Water with Increase in Soap Concentration

1. Why does the density of water decrease with an increase in soap concentration?

The decrease in the density of water with an increase in soap concentration is due to the presence of soap molecules in the water. Soap molecules have a hydrophilic (water-loving) head and a hydrophobic (water-repelling) tail. When soap is added to water, the hydrophobic tails cluster together, pushing the water molecules apart and creating empty spaces. These empty spaces decrease the overall density of the water, making it less dense.

2. How does the decrease in density of water affect its properties?

The decrease in density of water due to soap concentration has several effects on its properties. It can reduce the buoyancy of objects in water, making them sink faster. It can also decrease the water's ability to dissolve certain substances, as the spaces created by soap molecules make it harder for other molecules to interact with the water. Additionally, the decrease in density can affect the movement of water, making it less likely to form waves or currents.

3. Is the decrease in density of water with soap concentration permanent?

No, the decrease in density of water with soap concentration is not permanent. When the soap molecules are removed from the water, the water molecules are able to come back together and fill in the empty spaces, increasing the density of the water. This is why when you add soap to water, you can see bubbles forming on the surface - the soap molecules are creating empty spaces in the water.

4. Does the decrease in density of water with soap concentration affect its ability to support life?

Yes, the decrease in density of water with soap concentration can have negative effects on aquatic life. The decrease in buoyancy can make it harder for aquatic organisms to stay afloat, and the decrease in water movement can affect their food sources and oxygen supply. Additionally, the decrease in water's ability to dissolve substances can impact the availability of nutrients for aquatic organisms.

5. How can the decrease in density of water with soap concentration be measured?

The decrease in density of water with soap concentration can be measured using a hydrometer or a density meter. These instruments measure the density of a liquid by determining its specific gravity, which is the ratio of the density of the liquid to the density of water. By comparing the specific gravity of water with varying concentrations of soap, the decrease in density can be calculated and quantified.

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