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Difference between Civil Engineering Physics and non C.E. Physics?

  1. Mar 23, 2009 #1
    Whats the difference? i know that after 3 years you become a c.e. but what about the other one? Dont know which one to apply for.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 24, 2009 #2
    nobody wants to answer?
     
  4. Mar 24, 2009 #3

    Pyrrhus

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    Hello, I am a civil engineer doing a MSc in Transportation Engineering.

    I don't understand your question. What do you mean?
     
  5. Mar 24, 2009 #4
    I could take Civil Engineering in Physics (aka technical physics) its 5years or i could take physics in university which doesnt give a civil engineering degree.

    Here is the civil engineering description:
    http://www.kth.se/studies/swedish-programmes/msc/1.7784?l=en_UK [Broken]

    The other one is just called Physics.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Mar 24, 2009 #5

    djeitnstine

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    So what you're asking is what is the difference between being a civil engineering degree and physics?
     
  7. Mar 24, 2009 #6
    yes C.E in physics and physics.
     
  8. Mar 24, 2009 #7

    djeitnstine

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    Well civil engineers design roads, airports, bridges, dams etc. So logically CE physics would be the physics of those structures. You would mostly cover statics and solids, heat transfer, oscillations, wave theory etc... However, physics is just what it says, physics. My guess is the program you are looking at could be diverse and include some of the aforementioned topics and more, such as modern physics, intro to quantum mech, electricity and other cool stuff physicists do.

    Oh and thermodynamics would be common to them both

    But upperlevel classes in that school for CE physics is anyone's guess though but I just listed a few focus topics
     
  9. Mar 24, 2009 #8
    hmm which one is better? cause getting into the ce physics programm is 10times harder.
     
  10. Mar 24, 2009 #9

    djeitnstine

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    I can't give you the answer to that, you have to answer a few questions for yourself first.

    Do you like Engineering? Do you want to be an engineer in any way? Even if it were simply a CE physicist.

    What about physics? Do you like physics more? Do you want to be a 'pure' physicist?
     
  11. Mar 25, 2009 #10

    Pyrrhus

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    This link is Engineering Physics...

    Engineering Physics is not Civil Engineering.... well ok, THEY DIFFER in some courses.

    http://www.kth.se/studies/swedish-programmes/msc/1.7601?l=en_UK [Broken] <- That is the CE program.


    Well, i don't know what physics engineers do (probably go to grad school like the physicists...), but it probably is very different from what Civil Engineers do.

    Civil engineers use their knowledge to solve structural challenges (buildings, dams, roads, etc..), to solve transportation phenomena (traffic congestion, public transit systems, ...), to solve water resources management problems (aqueducts design, ...), focus on environmental concerns (Waste water treatment, ...), and many more.

    If you want to study Civil engineering because of its physics then you should not pick Civil engineering... Study PHYSICS.

    Good luck
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. Mar 25, 2009 #11

    djeitnstine

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    Hmm good point there
     
  13. Mar 25, 2009 #12

    f95toli

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    There is no such as "Civil Engineering Physics", my guess is that Okki2 is Swedish (since the link was to KTH) and he/she is confusing the term "Civilingenjör" (which litteraly translates to Civil Engineering, but actually means something that is roughly an MSc, quite similar to the German "DiplomIngenieur") with "Civil Engineering" (which would be "Civilingenjör i Väg&Vatten" in Swedish).

    What courses you need to take to get a MSc in Engineering Physics differs from university to university. But Engineering Physics Chalmers and KTH in Sweden it essentially an "advanced" degree where you in addition to physics take a lot of math courses (more than in an ordinary Physics Program) +some engineering courses (some electronics, control theory etc). During the second part of the program you start to specialize and there is nothing stopping you from going into theoretical physics; i.e. it doesn't have to be "applied" physics in any sense (e.g. Max Tegmark studied at KTH, and I don't think anyone would call what he is doing "applied") .

    I would hesitate to call Engineering Physics an "elite education" but it certainly has that reputation if you study at KTH/Chalmers. Most PhD students (and researchers) in Physics in Sweden studied engineering physics as undergraduates, so F at KTH/Chalmers is definitely a good idea if you are planning to pursue a career in academic research.
     
  14. Mar 25, 2009 #13
    i dont like anything except eating popcorn and watching steve wilkos. but i have to choose.
     
  15. Mar 25, 2009 #14
    thanks for the info guys...you've been a big help.

    What do you guys know about Stockholm University and their physics program?
     
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