Difference Between Thin and Conductive charge configurations

  • Thread starter Rawrzz
  • Start date
  • #1
6
0
Difference Between "Thin" and "Conductive" charge configurations

Is there any difference computationally between say a thin spherical insulating shell and a thin conductive shell ?

Can you create a capacitor with two thin insulating shells, one smaller than the other ?

I see most textbooks explicitly say that capacitors must be conductors. Is this so ?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
UltrafastPED
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,912
216
The charge enters the capacitor from outside - with an insulator the incoming charge is stuck in one spot, so it would make a lousy capacitor. With conducting surfaces source charges can flow so that the entire surface is charged (both plates/spheres).

The region between the conductors is the insulator; the charges on the plates induce small movements in the molecules of the conductor - they "polarize" the material, but no charge moves more than a few nanometers.
 
  • #3
6
0
Say a charge is already uniformly distributed on the thin spheres. Can you talk about capacitance then ? I realize that it is the practicality of charging that is the problem, but textbooks talk about uniform charge on insulators all the time.
 
  • #4
UltrafastPED
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,912
216

Related Threads on Difference Between Thin and Conductive charge configurations

Replies
1
Views
1K
F
Replies
2
Views
733
Replies
0
Views
572
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
39
Views
10K
Replies
14
Views
8K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
3K
Top