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EE to AE Grad Studies; Aerospace/Defense Industry

  1. Mar 11, 2014 #1
    I am currently an electrical engineering student, and I was wondering if it was possible to get a master's degree in AE if you have a BS or MS in EE. I know I at least want a master's in EE. I would like to work in the aerospace and defense industries. Are there many EE opportunities in this area.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2014 #2

    donpacino

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    Yes it is possible to get a master's degree in AE with a BS in EE. some of my fellow new hires at a defense company are working towards AE degrees, and 2 of them have EE backgrounds.
     
  4. Mar 12, 2014 #3
    For working in defense, would it be better to get a MS in AE, ME, physics, or a combination of these?
     
  5. Mar 13, 2014 #4
    As donpacion pointed out, it isn't a big deal to get a grad degree in a different field. I have a BS in Math and a BS in Finance. I started my grad education in a MS in Pure Math, realized I preferred applied math, realized applied math programs are a lot of pure math with a just flavor of applied on the side, and then just said screw this and transferred to a MS in Mech E where I take more applied math, physics, EE, CS, and ME courses than in applied. I don't have an undergraduate understanding in Engineering, but I still have a 3.7 GPA in Mech E so it is doable without the the undergrad knowledge in the field.
     
  6. Mar 13, 2014 #5
    For switching to a different program, was there prerequisites you needed to take before being accepted? If so, how much longer would it take?
     
  7. Mar 13, 2014 #6
    At first, they said I may need to take pre-reqs but that never materialized. I asked about it they said you are fine. The only pre-reqs would have been undergrad courses anyways. At that point though, I already passed and completed the core requirements. I had no engineering background just a math background and did fine. With an engineering background, you should be good to go since you have taken engineering core. I know at my university, the core engineering pre-reqs are similar for EE, ME, CE, etc.
     
  8. Mar 17, 2014 #7

    donpacino

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    That depends on what you want to do. I would say an ME degree is more marketable in general. if you really want to do aerospace engineering then either degree would work.

    I really can't comment on the physics degree
     
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