Electric field vector in component form

In summary, the conversation discussed finding the electric fields at various positions due to a -12nC charge located at (1.0cm, 0cm). The equation E=k(q/r^2) was mentioned, and the magnitude of the electric fields at two positions, (5.0cm, 0cm) and (-5.0cm, 0cm), were successfully calculated. The difficulty in finding the field strength for the last case, (0cm, 5.0cm), was mentioned and the concept of defining signs for electric fields was explained. It was noted that for a negative charge, the field points towards the charge, while for a positive charge, the field points away from the charge. The problem
  • #1
miyayeah
27
0

Homework Statement


A -12nC charge is located at (x,y) = (1.0cm, 0cm). What are the electric fields at the positions (x,y) = (5.0cm, 0cm), (-5.0cm, 0cm), and (0cm, 5.0cm)? Write each electric field vector in component form.

Homework Equations


E=k(q/r2)

The Attempt at a Solution


I was able to find the magnitude of the electric fields at the first two positions, but I am not sure how to find the last one. Also, how would you define the signs in this case for the first two electric fields? The answer for the first two were: -6.8x104 i N/C, 3.0x104 i N/C.
 
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  • #2
miyayeah said:
I was able to find the magnitude of the electric fields at the first two positions, but I am not sure how to find the last one.
Please show your work. What is the problem in finding the field strength for the last case in comparison to the previous two?

miyayeah said:
Also, how would you define the signs in this case for the first two electric fields?
For a negative charge, the field points towards the charge. For a positive charge, the field points away from the charge.
 
  • #3
Like Mr. Oroduin said above, the field points towards the charge, but what's your problem here? Can you find distance from point (0cm;5cm) to the point charge?
 

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Related to Electric field vector in component form

What is the electric field vector in component form?

The electric field vector in component form is a mathematical representation of the direction and magnitude of the electric field at a given point. It is expressed as a vector with three components - Ex, Ey, and Ez - representing the electric field in the x, y, and z directions, respectively.

How is the electric field vector in component form calculated?

The electric field vector in component form can be calculated using Coulomb's Law, which states that the magnitude of the electric field at a point is equal to the product of the electric charge and the distance between the charges, divided by the square of the distance between them.

What does each component of the electric field vector represent?

The x-component (Ex) represents the electric field in the x-direction, the y-component (Ey) represents the electric field in the y-direction, and the z-component (Ez) represents the electric field in the z-direction. Together, these components make up the overall direction and magnitude of the electric field at a given point.

How do the components of the electric field vector relate to each other?

The components of the electric field vector are related through vector addition. The overall electric field vector can be found by adding the individual components together using vector addition rules.

What are some real-world applications of the electric field vector in component form?

The electric field vector in component form is used in many areas of science and technology. It is particularly important in the study of electromagnetism, as it helps to understand the behavior of electric charges and their interactions. It is also used in designing and analyzing electrical circuits, as well as in fields such as telecommunications, electronics, and engineering.

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