Electromagnetic physical force feedback

  • Thread starter kolleamm
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I want to create a small pad consisting of two electromagnets that repel and attract each other, this can give the feeling that something is pushing up against your skin if held. Is this a practical idea?
 

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  • #2
CWatters
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What range of motion is required? Would a speaker work?
 
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What range of motion is required? Would a speaker work?
Something very compact and flat, maybe something you could fit on a finger tip. I'm not sure maybe a speaker would work, but perhaps they may be too big?
 
  • #4
anorlunda
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It sounds like a phone vibrator. They are small, and low-powered.

If you have two magents that move, you need something to make them move, and something else to power them like a battery. How small do you think you could make that?
 
  • #5
Tom.G
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A low impedance earbud after removing the part that goes into the ear (both the soft cushion and the hard plastic.) Their will be a metal diaphragm that moves with the applied current; that's what generates the sound. You will probably have to glue the diaphragm onto the case, it is normally held on by the part you removed.
 
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Drakkith
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I want to create a small pad consisting of two electromagnets that repel and attract each other, this can give the feeling that something is pushing up against your skin if held. Is this a practical idea?
There's not really enough details here to say yes or no. What is the purpose of this? What do you mean when you say that it will give the feeling that something is pushing up against your skin? Just holding a rock will give me the feeling that something is pushing against my skin. Will these magnets be part of a larger device, such as a glove or some other apparatus? These kinds of details matter a great deal, as they decide how big these magnets would need to be, how much power they would require, where they would be located, etc.
 
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There's not really enough details here to say yes or no. What is the purpose of this? What do you mean when you say that it will give the feeling that something is pushing up against your skin? Just holding a rock will give me the feeling that something is pushing against my skin. Will these magnets be part of a larger device, such as a glove or some other apparatus? These kinds of details matter a great deal, as they decide how big these magnets would need to be, how much power they would require, where they would be located, etc.
Hi, your right about giving more details. Just like you mentioned I would like to use these embedded electromagnets in a glove. The two electromagnets repel each other giving a feeling of force on the users fingers or palm by them pushing up against it, that's the general idea I had in mind. I would like to try to make some electromagnets but thought it be better to ask here first to see if this is practical.

Thanks for all your responses so far
 
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Drakkith
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Thanks for the link! I will have to do more research on wired gloves for sure now! :) I'm just wondering why nobody uses electromagnets for haptic feedback. Too bulky perhaps?
Probably. 'Good' force feedback would require very, very small magnets thanks to how sensitive our fingers and hands are.
 

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