Air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet

In summary, a valve is lifted against 10" of water and then drops due to the air pressure. The valve is comprised of a lightweight wood felt and leather rectangle, and is hinged along one of the short ends. The surface of the leather facing up when the valve is inoperable must drop down to allow the air to pass upward through a hole. The LIFT is a normal term (albeit old and antiquated IMO) used in industry to describe air pressure.
  • #1
I am looking to open a series of valves in a chamber under 10" of lift(water) ~.36psi which are normally held closed by a very light spring and the constant air pressure. The valves are very light weight and range in surface size from approx 2 to 6 sq inches, or approx .72 to 2.16 lb of initial force to begin opening them.

The valves offer the greatest resistance when closed so I need the greatest force to begin opening them but once they start to open the force drops dramatically to mainly the lightweight spring. The weight of the valve at this point actually aids in keeping it open as they are dropping down (hinged at one end). The travel of the free end of the valve surface would be approx 3/8".

My thought was to use a very strong permanent magnet situated in direct contact with an electromagnet such that when energized the two magnets would repel each other. This would create a force profile ideally suited to this application as the repelling force would drop as the two magnets moved away from each other and the required force to keep the valve open would also decrease.

QUESTION 1: Am I correct in assuming that I can leverage the strong force of the permanent magnet against a relatively weak electromagnet (so as to limit the current/turns required) OR will the repulsive force be closer to the weaker force of the electromagnet? If I cannot leverage the strong force of the permanent magnet this would not be a viable application.

QUESTION 2: Can an air core for the electromagnet suffice as the core of the electromagnet, IMO, cannot be iron less the permanent magnet would be so attracted to it as to require excessive current/turns to break that attraction.

The requirement for 1000s of these magnets in this application makes it imperative to minimize the current and to a lessor extent the amount of wire for each coil. These coils will have at most a 10% duty cycle and ideally run at approx 12vdc.
 
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  • #2
Wurlitzer28 said:
under 10" of lift(water) ~.36psi
Wurlitzer28 said:
2 to 6 sq inches, or approx .72 to 2.16 lb of initial force to begin opening them.
Toilet tank flush valves?
Wurlitzer28 said:
dropping down
You initially describe a valve being lifted against 10" water, and now you're dropping them; could you restate this?
 
  • #3
These valves are rectangular pallet valves comprised of a light weight wood covered on their upper surface in felt and leather. They are hinged along one of the short ends of the rectangle.

They are mounted within a pressurized chamber with the leather surface facing up and when operated they must drop down to allow the air to pass upward through a hole in the top surface of the chamber.

The LIFT is a normal term (albeit old and antiquated IMO) used in industry to describe air pressure. Why it is still used?? That is why I gave the conversion to .36psi. Sort of like mercury used as a reference for vacuum. Just a way to confuse the issue. But then again I prefer CPS to Hertz. A 10" lift will raise a column of water 10".
 
  • #4
Wurlitzer28 said:
QUESTION 1: Am I correct in assuming that I can leverage the strong force of the permanent magnet against a relatively weak electromagnet (so as to limit the current/turns required) OR will the repulsive force be closer to the weaker force of the electromagnet? If I cannot leverage the strong force of the permanent magnet this would not be a viable application.
The permanent magnet is going to look just like the armature of any solenoid to the electromagnet. Sorry.
Wurlitzer28 said:
QUESTION 2: Can an air core for the electromagnet suffice as the core of the electromagnet, IMO, cannot be iron less the permanent magnet would be so attracted to it as to require excessive current/turns to break that attraction.
Polarity of an iron core is controlled by the winding, and so long as you leave a gap, say thickness of your valve, you should be able to push neodymium magnets fastened to the flappers around at will.
You should be able to pick magnets up at a novelty shop for a couple bucks, and play with relay/solenoid coils and armatures as a test.
 
  • #5


I would like to first commend you for considering such a creative and efficient solution for operating these valves. It seems like you have a good understanding of the principles of magnetism and electromagnetism.

To answer your first question, yes, you are correct in assuming that you can leverage the strong force of the permanent magnet against the weaker electromagnet. The repulsive force between two magnets is dependent on their respective strengths, so the stronger magnet will have a greater influence on the force profile. However, it is important to consider the distance between the two magnets and the strength of the electromagnet. If the distance is too great or the electromagnet is too weak, the repulsive force may not be strong enough to open the valves.

For your second question, an air core for the electromagnet may suffice as long as it is strong enough to produce the required repulsive force. Iron cores are typically used in electromagnets because they can increase the strength of the magnetic field, but as you mentioned, this may not be suitable in this case due to the permanent magnet's attraction to it. You may need to experiment with different materials and designs to find the most efficient solution for your specific application.

Overall, your approach to using a permanent magnet and electromagnet to open these valves seems feasible. However, I would recommend conducting some experiments or simulations to ensure that the force profile and electromagnet strength are sufficient to open the valves consistently and effectively. Thank you for considering my response and I wish you the best of luck in your project.
 

What is an air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet?

An air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet is a type of valve that is controlled by both a permanent magnet and an electro magnet. The permanent magnet provides a constant force, while the electro magnet can be turned on and off to control the flow of air.

How does an air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet work?

An air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet works by using the force of a permanent magnet to keep the valve open. When an electro magnet is activated, it creates a magnetic field that opposes the force of the permanent magnet, causing the valve to close. By controlling the activation of the electro magnet, the flow of air through the valve can be regulated.

What are the advantages of using an air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet?

There are several advantages to using an air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet. These include precise control of air flow, no need for external power sources, and a longer lifespan compared to other types of valves.

What are the applications of an air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet?

An air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet can be used in a variety of applications, including pneumatic systems, air compressors, and vacuum systems. It is also commonly used in industries such as manufacturing, automotive, and aerospace.

How do I choose the right air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet for my project?

When choosing an air valve operated by permanent & electro magnet, consider factors such as the required flow rate, pressure range, and compatibility with your system. It is also important to consider the quality and reliability of the valve, as well as its cost-effectiveness for your specific project.

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