Electrons and electromagnetic radiation.

In summary, electrons can only exist in certain orbits, and when they fall back down they emit photons.
  • #1
LogicalAcid
137
0
Well, first of all, there are two ''kinds'' of electrons,correct? Valence, the ones furthest from the nucleus of the atom, and ''regular'', the ones most tightly bound to the nucleus. Light is generated as electrons ''spin'' in their orbitals, so if light is made when an electron is in a higher orbital, because it came in contact with another particle, it absorbed the energy of that particle and the electrons gained an orbital. Electrons can't stay in this exited state forever, and when they return from the exited state into a normal orbital, they emit photons. The frequency of the photon depends on the ''height'' the electrons fell from. If it occupied a very high orbital, the photon it emits will have a higher frequency, if it was a lower orbital (but still exited) the photon would have a lower frequency. The questions here are
-How does coming into contact with another photon make the electrons basically jump?
-If all matter has electrons ''spinning", all matter emits radiation in one of the wavelengths, but in order for the matter to emit higher frequency photons, it must come in contact with a a photon of higher energy? In shorter words, if and object was hit by gamma rays, the object would have its electrons exited to a state that once they fall they emit gamma rays?
-How do radioactive substances emit gamma rays, if they being unstable has nothing to do with electron orbitals?
 
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  • #2
LogicalAcid said:
-How do radioactive substances emit gamma rays, if they being unstable has nothing to do with electron orbitals?
Electron orbitals represent chemical energy, like TNT. Gamma rays and radioactivity represent nuclear energy, like nuclear weapons.
Bob S
 
  • #3
LogicalAcid said:
Well, first of all, there are two ''kinds'' of electrons,correct? Valence, the ones furthest from the nucleus of the atom, and ''regular'', the ones most tightly bound to the nucleus.

Er... just "two"? What about free electrons? Or what about electrons that have form pairs? This is a rather strange categorization of electrons.

Light is generated as electrons ''spin'' in their orbitals

Incorrect. An electron in an orbital does NOT radiate. Those are stable orbits and do not radiate. Please read our FAQ in the General Physics forum.

, so if light is made when an electron is in a higher orbital, because it came in contact with another particle, it absorbed the energy of that particle and the electrons gained an orbital.

There's so many things wrong with this. Light can be produced during an transition that follows the selection rule. It doesn't have to "come in contact" with other particles.

Electrons can't stay in this exited state forever, and when they return from the exited state into a normal orbital, they emit photons. The frequency of the photon depends on the ''height'' the electrons fell from. If it occupied a very high orbital, the photon it emits will have a higher frequency, if it was a lower orbital (but still exited) the photon would have a lower frequency. The questions here are
-How does coming into contact with another photon make the electrons basically jump?
-If all matter has electrons ''spinning", all matter emits radiation in one of the wavelengths, but in order for the matter to emit higher frequency photons, it must come in contact with a a photon of higher energy? In shorter words, if and object was hit by gamma rays, the object would have its electrons exited to a state that once they fall they emit gamma rays?
-How do radioactive substances emit gamma rays, if they being unstable has nothing to do with electron orbitals?

I have no idea where to start.

Note that just in case you are unaware of this, light can also be made NOT using atoms. Radio waves are generated out of antennas that have oscillating currents. Light sources at various synchrotron centers make light by oscillating bunches of electrons.

Zz.
 

1. What are electrons and how do they relate to electromagnetic radiation?

Electrons are tiny subatomic particles that have a negative charge. They are found in atoms, and their movement is responsible for creating electromagnetic radiation. When electrons move from one energy level to another, they release energy in the form of electromagnetic radiation.

2. How are electrons arranged in an atom?

Electrons are arranged in specific energy levels or shells around the nucleus of an atom. The first shell can hold up to 2 electrons, the second shell can hold up to 8 electrons, and the third shell can hold up to 18 electrons. The electrons closest to the nucleus have lower energy levels, while those in outer shells have higher energy levels.

3. What is the relationship between energy and electromagnetic radiation?

Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that travels in waves. The amount of energy in electromagnetic radiation is determined by its wavelength and frequency. The shorter the wavelength and higher the frequency, the more energy the radiation carries.

4. How does electromagnetic radiation interact with matter?

Electromagnetic radiation can interact with matter in different ways depending on its wavelength and energy. High-energy radiation like gamma rays and X-rays can penetrate matter and cause damage to cells. Visible light can be absorbed, reflected, or transmitted by matter. Infrared radiation is mostly absorbed by matter, while radio waves can pass through matter without being absorbed.

5. How is electromagnetic radiation used in technology and everyday life?

Electromagnetic radiation has many practical applications, such as in communication technology (radio waves), medical imaging (X-rays), and cooking (microwaves). It is also used in everyday objects like remote controls, cell phones, and Wi-Fi routers. However, high levels of exposure to certain types of electromagnetic radiation can be harmful to living organisms.

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