Energy Saving/High Efficiency Clothes Washers Are a Horrible Design/Concept

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In summary: I have no idea why balance is such a problem, but recently I had a specific need so I washed a new polo, 3 tshirts and a few assorted pairs of underwear and socks. It still went out of balance and failed/stopped.1. I have a GE washer which has a "deep fill" override button, which helps remedy the stupid not-enough-water design.2. I have no idea why balance is such a problem, but recently I had a specific need so I washed a new polo, 3 tshirts and a few assorted pairs of underwear and socks. It still went out of balance and failed/stopped. Ok, maybe an idea about it:
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kyphysics
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In the old days, you could load your washer drum up with clothes to near the top. Then, when you hit "large/heavy" load, the water would cover your clothes and get up to the top.

Nowadays, machines are designed to be energy efficient/high efficiency and supposedly don't need to use that much water and a "large/heavy" load only fills the water up to the half-way mark of the drum (AT MOST) or, in my uncle's house's case, about 25% of the drum height. I've stood and watched the machine try to clean the clothes (he has a clear see-through lid) and the water level never covered the clothing (about a mix of 10-12 garments of shirts/pants) and things came out soapy and not washed properly at the end.

It's so bad that you either have to wash 5 garments of clothing (MAXIMUM) at a time or add more water yourself after the machine fills up. But, adding more water seems to strain the suspension/shocks (is that the right term?) and have them get "loosened" over time so that now your machine will shake, rattle, and "walk" (literally move inches or even feet out of place when shaking on something like a spin cycle).

This can damage your floor boards and other things (if they "walk" too far, might even the hoses be detached?).

Instead of being energy saving, they are time wasting and even energy WASTING (having to do so many more loads).

These modern washers suck and are designed horribly.
 
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So, because your washer exhibits a particular behavior, every single such washer on the planet exhibits the same behavior? Right....
 
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I have a high efficiency washing machine (my second actually) and I can load an entire overflowing basket without having any problems. No soapiness, no wobbling, nothing. Note that the water should never need to fill the entire drum. Even if you fill the drum all the way to the top with clothes they should lose their 'fluff' as they absorb water and compact somewhat.

If you're having these kinds of problems with your machines then I'd recommend shopping for a machine of a different brand. Also make sure you're buying a washing machine with a large enough internal volume to fit your washing needs.
 
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Drakkith said:
I have a high efficiency washing machine (my second actually) and I can load an entire overflowing basket without having any problems. No soapiness, no wobbling, nothing. Note that the water should never need to fill the entire drum. Even if you fill the drum all the way to the top with clothes they should lose their 'fluff' as they absorb water and compact somewhat.

If you're having these kinds of problems with your machines then I'd recommend shopping for a machine of a different brand. Also make sure you're buying a washing machine with a large enough internal volume to fit your washing needs.
What brand/model do you have if you don't mind sharing. I have this:
https://www.geappliances.com/applia...asher-with-Stainless-Steel-Basket-GTW335ASNWW

If you click "Ratings & Reviews" + "Lowest to Highest," you can see MANY complaints of water not filling up and also the thing shaking/moving.
 
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kyphysics said:
in my uncle's house's case, about 25% of the drum height. I've stood and watched the machine try to clean the clothes (he has a clear see-through lid) and the water level never covered the clothing (about a mix of 10-12 garments of shirts/pants) and things came out soapy and not washed properly at the end.
What does the manual for that clothes washer say about how best to load it? Surely you've read that manual, correct?

(and sorry to call you "Shirley") :smile:
 
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kyphysics said:
you can see MANY complaints of water not filling up
So why did you buy it then?
And how does this mean other washers have the same problem?
 
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kyphysics said:
These modern washers suck and are designed horribly.
Somewhere on PF there's an angry rant by me on this subject. A couple of points:

1. I have a GE washer which has a "deep fill" override button, which helps remedy the stupid not-enough-water design.

2. I have no idea why balance is such a problem, but recently I had a specific need so I washed a new polo, 3 tshirts and a few assorted pairs of underwear and socks. Literally a pound of clothes at most. It still went out of balance and failed/stopped. Ok, maybe an idea about it: due to the high spin rate and associated forces they've decided balance is so critical that there's no point in trying to deal with any balance imperfection no matter how small. The result though is that at least half of my laundry loads fail to finish due to balance problems. Ironically there's also a mode where the washer tries to correct the out of balance situation by doing a complete fill and additional rinse. It has never worked that I've noticed, but wastes both time and water.

All that said, what fill setting are you using? Looking at your link, the selector knob seems to nearly match the old style units and I would expect to fill all the way if you select "max". It doesn't? Also, I don't see it being claimed as a "high efficiency" washer. Mine is something like this one:
https://www.geappliances.com/applia...h-Sanitize-w-Oxi-and-FlexDispense-GTW720BSNWS

Note, mine is EnergyStar certified and yours is not.
 
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Vanadium 50 said:
So, because your washer exhibits a particular behavior, every single such washer on the planet exhibits the same behavior? Right....
I know you have beef with the OP, but he didn't say "every single" and these are indeed known issues with many modern high efficiency washers. We've discussed them before here and consumer reviews/reports are flush with examples. Ironically they try to spin the bug as a feature; they use less water, which makes the washing less effective, which they mitigate by making it take longer, which they then advertise as being gentle, efficient and more effective. Example of the issue:
https://www.consumerreports.org/cro...and-cons-of-high-efficiency-washers/index.htm

Note: cleaning problems are well documented, balance problems less so. But I've seen many complaints and the difference between my old and new washers with no change in my washing habits is absolutely incredible. My mother confirms.
So why did you buy it then?
And how does this mean other washers have the same problem?
These comments are really unhelpful/overly aggressive/hostile. I also have a GE washer and I picked it specifically because while low water levels are the entire point of high efficiency washers, the one I bought lets me override that design flaw compromise. It's less bad than average on that score and I worked hard to find it.
 
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russ_watters said:
OP, but he didn't say "every single"
No, but he did say "horrible design concept". That generalizes pretty far - every machine with the same design will have this problem, or will narrowly avoid it.

If the question was "this particular machine has this particular problem, what can I do?" we could maybe help him address it. If it's just a general rant based dn one daya point, there is little to do beyond rolling our virtual eyes.

This model has been on sale for about 8 years. If he bought it then, before the reviews, the follow-up is "jas this been happening for 8 years? Why didn't you complain when it was new?" If the answer is "it's just started", the follow-up is "why don't you have a repairman look at it?"
 
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Vanadium 50 said:
This model has been on sale for about 8 years. If he bought it then, before the reviews, the follow-up is "jas this been happening for 8 years? Why didn't you complain when it was new?" If the answer is "it's just started", the follow-up is "why don't you have a repairman look at it?"
Per my post, it's a feature not a bug. There's nothing to complain to the MFG or a repairman about. Complaints should be directed to the EPA.

No, but he did say "horrible design concept". That generalizes pretty far - every machine with the same design will have this problem, or will narrowly avoid it.
My annoyed response to your annoyed response took the wrong tack. My answer should have been: yes, it's an industry-wide, standard flawed design concept.
 

Related to Energy Saving/High Efficiency Clothes Washers Are a Horrible Design/Concept

Why are energy-saving/high-efficiency clothes washers considered a horrible design?

Energy-saving/high-efficiency clothes washers are often criticized because they use less water and energy, which some users feel leads to less effective cleaning. Additionally, they may have longer cycle times and require specific detergents, which can be seen as inconvenient.

Do energy-saving washers really save money in the long run?

Yes, energy-saving washers typically save money over time through reduced water and electricity bills. However, the initial cost can be higher, and some users may not notice significant savings immediately, leading to frustration.

Are there common maintenance issues with high-efficiency washers?

High-efficiency washers can sometimes experience issues such as mold or mildew buildup due to the lower water usage. Regular maintenance, such as cleaning the gasket and using the right detergent, is essential to prevent these problems.

How do energy-saving washers impact the environment?

Energy-saving washers have a positive impact on the environment by reducing water and energy consumption. This helps lower the carbon footprint and conserves natural resources, aligning with sustainability goals.

Can high-efficiency washers handle heavy-duty laundry needs?

High-efficiency washers are designed to handle a variety of laundry loads, including heavy-duty items. However, users may need to adjust their expectations and use specific settings or detergents to achieve the best results for heavily soiled clothes.

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