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Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics by Russell Hibbeler

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  1. Jan 27, 2013 #1

    Astronuc

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    Table of Contents:
    Code (Text):

    1 General Principles 3

    1.1 Mechanics 3
    1.2 Fundamental Concepts 4
    1.3 Units of Measurement 7
    1.4 T he International System of Units 9
    1.5 Numerical Calculations 10
    1.6 General Procedure for Analysis 12

    2 Force Vectors 17

    2.1 Scalars and Vectors 17
    2.2 Vector Operations 18
    2.3 Vector Addition of Forces 20
    2.4 Addition of a System of Coplanar Forces 32
    2.5 C artesian Vectors 43
    2.6 Addition of Cartesian Vectors 46
    2.7 Position Vectors 56
    2.8 Force Vector Directed Along a Line 59
    2.9 Dot Product 69

    3 Equilibrium of a Particle 85

    3.1 Condition for the Equilibrium of a Particle 85
    3.2 The Free-Body Diagram 86
    3.3 Coplanar Force Systems 89
    3.4 Three-Dimensional Force Systems 103

    4 Force System Resultants 117

    4.1 Moment of a Force–Scalar Formulation 117
    4.2 Cross Product 121
    4.3 Moment of a Force–Vector Formulation 124
    4.4 Principle of Moments 128
    4.5 Moment of a Force about a Specified Axis 139
    4.6 Moment of a Couple 148
    4.7 Simplification of a Force and Couple System 160
    4.8 Further Simplification of a Force and Couple System 170
    4.9 Reduction of a Simple Distributed Loading 183

    5 Equilibrium of a Rigid Body 199

    5.1 Conditions for Rigid-Body Equilibrium 199
    5.2 Free-Body Diagrams 201
    5.3 Equations of Equilibrium 214
    5.4 Two- and Three-Force Members 224
    5.5 Free-Body Diagrams 237
    5.6 Equations of Equilibrium 242
    5.7 Constraints and Statical Determinacy 243

    6 Structural Analysis 263

    6.1 Simple Trusses 263
    6.2 The Method of Joints 266
    6.3 Zero-Force Members 272
    6.4 The Method of Sections 280
    6.5 Space Trusses 290
    6.6 Frames and Machines 294

    7 Internal Forces 331

    7.1 Internal Loadings Developed in Structural Members 331
    7.2 Shear and Moment Equations and Diagrams 347
    7.3 Relations between Distributed Load, Shear, and Moment 356
    7.4 Cables 367

    8 Friction 389

    8.1 Characteristics of Dry Friction 389
    8.2 Problems Involving Dry Friction 394
    8.3 Wedges 416
    8.4 Frictional Forces on Screws 418
    8.5 Frictional Forces on Flat Belts 425
    8.6 Frictional Forces on Collar Bearings, Pivot Bearings, and Disks 433
    8.7 Frictional Forces on Journal Bearings 436
    8.8 Rolling Resistance 438

    9 Center of Gravity and Centroid 451

    9.1 Center of Gravity, Center of Mass, and the Centroid of a Body 451
    9.2 Composite Bodies 474
    9.3 Theorems of Pappus and Guldinus 488
    9.4 Resultant of a General Distributed Loading 497
    9.5 Fluid Pressure 498

    10 Moments of Inertia 515

    10.1 Definition of Moments of Inertia for Areas 515
    10.2 Parallel-Axis Theorem for an Area 516
    10.3 Radius of Gyration of an Area 517
    10.4 Moments of Inertia for Composite Areas 526
    10.5 Product of Inertia for an Area 534
    10.6 Moments of Inertia for an Area about Inclined Axes 538
    10.7 Mohr’s Circle for Moments of Inertia 541
    10.8 Mass Moment of Inertia 549

    11 Virtual Work 567

    11.1 Definition of Work 567
    11.2 Principle of Virtual Work 569
    11.3 Principle of Virtual Work for a System of Connected Rigid Bodies 571
    11.4 Conservative Forces 583
    11.5 Potential Energy 584
    11.6 Potential-Energy Criterion for Equilibrium 586
    11.7 Stability of Equilibrium Configuration 587 Appendix

    Contents

    12 Kinematics of a Particle

    12.1 Introduction
    12.2 Rectilinear Kinematics: Continuous Motion
    12.3 Rectilinear Kinematics: Erratic Motion
    12.4 General Curvilinear Motion
    12.5 Curvilinear Motion: Rectangular Components
    12.6 Motion of a Projectile
    12.7 Curvilinear Motion: Normal and Tangential Components
    12.8 Curvilinear Motion: Cylindrical Components
    12.9 Absolute Dependent Motion Analysis of Two Particles
    12.10 Relative-Motion of Two Particles Using Translating Axes

    13 Kinetics of a Particle: Force and Acceleration

    13.1 Newton’s Second Law of Motion
    13.2 The Equation of Motion
    13.3 Equation of Motion for a System of Particles
    13.4 Equations of Motion: Rectangular Coordinates
    13.5 Equations of Motion: Normal and Tangential Coordinates
    13.6 Equations of Motion: Cylindrical Coordinates
    *13.7 Central-Force Motion and Space Mechanics

    14 Kinetics of a Particle: Work and Energy

    14.1 The Work of a Force
    14.2 Principle of Work and Energy
    14.3 Principle of Work and Energy for a System of Particles
    14.4 Power and Efficiency
    14.5 Conservative Forces and Potential Energy
    14.6 Conservation of Energy

    15 Kinetics of a Particle: Impulse and Momentum

    15.1 Principle of Linear Impulse and Momentum
    15.2 Principle of Linear Impulse and Momentum for a System of Particles
    15.3 Conservation of Linear Momentum for a System of Particles
    15.4 Impact
    15.5 Angular Momentum
    15.6 Relation Between Moment of a Force and Angular Momentum
    15.7 Principle of Angular Impulse and Momentum
    15.8 Steady Flow of a Fluid Stream
    *15.9 Propulsion with Variable Mass

    16 Planar Kinematics of a Rigid Body

    16.1 Planar Rigid-Body Motion
    16.2 Translation
    16.3 Rotation about a Fixed Axis
    16.4 Absolute Motion Analysis
    16.5 Relative-Motion Analysis: Velocity
    16.6 Instantaneous Center of Zero Velocity
    16.7 Relative-Motion Analysis: Acceleration
    16.8 Relative-Motion Analysis using Rotating Axes

    17 Planar Kinetics of a Rigid Body: Force and Acceleration

    17.1 Mass Moment of Inertia
    17.2 Planar Kinetic Equations of Motion
    17.3 Equations of Motion: Translation
    17.4 Equations of Motion: Rotation about a Fixed Axis
    17.5 Equations of Motion: General Plane Motion

    18 Planar Kinetics of a Rigid Body: Work and Energy

    18.1 Kinetic Energy
    18.2 The Work of a Force
    18.3 The Work of a Couple Moment
    18.4 Principle of Work and Energy
    18.5 Conservation of Energy

    19 Planar Kinetics of a Rigid Body: Impulse and Momentum

    19.1 Linear and Angular Momentum
    19.2 Principle of Impulse and Momentum
    19.3 Conservation of Momentum
    *19.4 Eccentric Impact

    20 Three-Dimensional Kinematics of a Rigid Body

    20.1 Rotation About a Fixed Point
    *20.2 The Time Derivative of a Vector Measured from Either a Fixed or Translating-Rotating System
    20.3 General Motion
    *20.4 Relative-Motion Analysis Using Translating and Rotating Axes

    21 Three-Dimensional Kinetics of a Rigid Body

    *21.1 Moments and Products of Inertia
    21.2 Angular Momentum
    21.3 Kinetic Energy
    *21.4 Equations of Motion
    *21.5 Gyroscopic Motion
    21.6 Torque-Free Motion

    22 Vibrations

    *22.1 Undamped Free Vibration
    *22.2 Energy Methods
    *22.3 Undamped Forced Vibration
    *22.4 Viscous Damped Free Vibration
    *22.5 Viscous Damped Forced Vibration
    *22.6 Electrical Circuit Analogs

    A Mathematical Expressions

    B Vector Analysis

    C The Chain Rule

    Fundamental Problems Partial

    Solutions and Answers
     
    Publisher's page: http://www.mypearsonstore.com/books...anics-statics-dynamics-9780132915489?xid=PSED
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 29, 2013 #2
    Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics by Russell Hibbeler

    I actually used Hibbeler books, I have all the new editions for statics, dynamics and mechanics of materials. They are pretty well written books
     
  4. Jan 29, 2013 #3
    I am in 'engineering physics 1' currently and the professor I have also teaches a statics class. He uses Hibbeler's book for his statics class and actually gives us (in physics) vector problems out of this book. So far this seems like a good book, although I can't give the best opinion since I haven't actually taken statics yet.
     
  5. Jan 29, 2013 #4
    Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics by Russell Hibbeler

    Statics is pretty much physics 1. Now strength of materials is a whole new monster but you'll need statics to do anything in that class
     
  6. Jan 29, 2013 #5

    jhae2.718

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    Gold Member

    I dislike the way dynamics is presented in this book. I think it's better to stress the use of vectors (i.e. if it's a dynamics problem always use vectors and rigorously solve the problem) and to introduce the kinematic transport theorem earlier.
     
  7. Jan 29, 2013 #6
    Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics by Russell Hibbeler

    Agreed but I find dynamics to be pretty boring to begin with. Heat transfer and statics were more interesting to me
     
  8. Jan 30, 2013 #7

    jhae2.718

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    Gold Member

    Re: Engineering Mechanics: Statics & Dynamics by Russell Hibbeler

    We appear to be complete opposites. (Though as a dynamicist I haven't done much heat transfer.)

    I'd go on further, but I don't want to get off-topic. (More off-topic?)
     
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